Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information

Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information

Manuel Lima / Feb 28, 2020

Visual Complexity Mapping Patterns of Information Our ability to generate information now far exceeds our capacity to understand it Finding patterns and making meaningful connections inside complex data networks has emerged as one of the biggest chal

  • Title: Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information
  • Author: Manuel Lima
  • ISBN: 9781568989365
  • Page: 414
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Our ability to generate information now far exceeds our capacity to understand it Finding patterns and making meaningful connections inside complex data networks has emerged as one of the biggest challenges of the twenty first century In recent years, designers, researchers, and scientists have begun employing an innovative mix of colors, symbols, graphics, algorithms, aOur ability to generate information now far exceeds our capacity to understand it Finding patterns and making meaningful connections inside complex data networks has emerged as one of the biggest challenges of the twenty first century In recent years, designers, researchers, and scientists have begun employing an innovative mix of colors, symbols, graphics, algorithms, and interactivity to clarify, and often beautify, the clutter From representing networks of friends on Facebook to depicting interactions among proteins in a human cell, Visual Complexity presents one hundred of the most interesting examples of information visualization by the field s leading practitioners.

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      Published :2019-06-24T14:06:11+00:00

    About "Manuel Lima"

      • Manuel Lima

        A Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and nominated by Creativity magazine as one of the 50 most creative and influential minds of 2009, Manuel Lima is the founder of VisualComplexity, Design Lead at Google, and a regular teacher of data visualization at Parsons School of Design.Manuel is a leading voice on information visualization and has spoken at numerous conferences, universities, and festivals around the world, including TED, Lift, OFFF, Eyeo, Ars Electronica, IxDA Interaction, Harvard, Yale, MIT, the Royal College of Art, NYU Tisch School of the Arts, ENSAD Paris, the University of Amsterdam, and MediaLab Prado Madrid He has also been featured in various magazines and newspapers, such as Wired, the New York Times, Science, Nature, Businessweek, Creative Review, Fast Company, Forbes, Grafik, SEED, tapes, and El Pa s.His first book, Visual Complexity Mapping Patterns of Information, has been translated into French, Chinese, and Japanese His second, The Book of Trees Visualizing Branches of Knowledge, covers eight hundred years of human culture through the lens of the tree figure, from its entrenched roots in religious medieval exegesis to its contemporary, secular digital themes.With than twelve years of experience designing digital products, Manuel has worked for Codecademy, Microsoft, Nokia, R GA, and Kontrapunkt He holds a BFA in Industrial Design and a MFA in Design Technology from Parsons School of Design During the course of his MFA program, Manuel worked for Siemens Corporate Research Center, the American Museum of Moving Image, and Parsons Institute for Information Mapping in research projects for the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.


    642 Comments

    1. I hate to down-rate this book, because it is very well researched and well written, but I just wasn't able to be as excited about this as I have been with Edward Tufte's books, to which this one is compared by one of the blurb writers. Part of the problem is that this book deals solely with visual representations of networks - an interesting genre, I'm sure, but one that stands more in the realm or art than science unless you drill down pretty far into the details of the network analysis and the [...]


    2. The subtitle of this book should be - Visualization done wrong. This book seems to be all about dumping raw data into one frame and hope to wow readers. The result, giant hairball with no discernible pattern - fail. Miniscule, unreadable and overlapping labels - fail. No legend, no description of what visual elements like color, size, weight is encoding - fail. There are over a hundred graph show cased. Most graph, often unreadable hairball, occupying a full page. It is accompany by a descriptio [...]


    3. If you want a coffee table book on data visualization that is heavy on aesthetics and philosophical noodling, but light on practical value, then this book is for you. There are many pretty pictures, but most of them make no sense and offer little to no insight. It seems to have a good representation of the different types of visualizations that are popular but next to no advice on why one type is better than another type for any particular purpose. Personally I would prefer less flowery delivery [...]


    4. Great book making for a great read replete with beautiful pictures. In short, I want it for my own library. It was the ideal companion to the complexity studies I am currently engaged in. The history of the tree being used as a visualization technique in the history of knowledge and how it is being abandoned for the network visualization technique of the nodes and links model is very enlightening. It then goes into the ubiquitous nature of the interconnected network model. The book comes stocked [...]


    5. "Meeting the needs of global society does not require infinite economic growth but an understanding of and respect for the regenerative limits of the biosphere."Manuel Lima is an ecological optimist, and he believes that collecting, connecting, presenting and integrating data is the key to human survival. He thinks we can overcome human selfishness and greed through visualization, through networkism--"the net has no center"--a complex open system that mimics natural processes, rather than the hi [...]


    6. Lima is a passionate guide to visualization. He begins with a brief history of attempts to visualize complex information (many of them religious in nature) and moves into the computer age briskly, covering a number of essential concepts regarding data and Big Data, networking, and the internet. The strongest part of the book is the section cataloging the multiple forms that new visualizations take, with examples of each and lots of references that enable one to find the live versions online (an [...]



    7. Very nicely designed, glossy overview of network visualization approaches, as of a few years back. Insightful history and analysis as well as the pretty pictures. But, left me with the feeling that, with a few exceptions, plotting networks with more than a couple of dozen nodes is pointless, and that perhaps there are better ways of finding and providing insights from connectivity data. Very few of the images came with captions that said, "and thus, we learned an impactful fact", or "and thus, w [...]



    8. This is not an easy book to rate, given that it's partially a guide to understanding data visualization and partially an enthralling coffee-table-esque tome (that still needed to be carried to and from coffee shops so I could read it).Lima writes in an engaging manner and his work in explicating what visualizations should do and are good for is well done. I could almost wish for a bit more text, actually, some of his thoughts and interpretations of the many visualizations within. Seeing him "rea [...]


    9. The author does a good job of tracing the history of network visualization and how cultural and scientific shifts have demanded new forms of articulation. The second half of the book forms a picture gallery broken down by theme and graph type. I found this part to be challenging - not least because of tiny type and hard to make sense of graphs. But ultimately this becomes an exercise in aesthetics because too often the methods used to come by the visualizations are just too pithy.


    10. Great book on network knowledge and visualization of complex data. He includes several chapters on the historical view of information partitioning from the 1500's to today that includes attempts at categorizing all knowledge and led to methodologies such as the Dewey Decimal system. He then spends the rest of the book on really beautiful visualizations of big data by groups that have posted there projects to his web site.


    11. While the beginning parts were relatively accessible, some of the later diagrams have so much going on that they essentially tell you nothing. They whole point of data visualization imo is to convey information, and how can you do that when the only thing presented is a mess of colored lines with little to no context? Clearly very well researched, but I wish it was more practical?


    12. Ah. This was "visualization of networks" and only that (as opposed to "patterns of information" which sounds immenesly more interesting). Not what I was looking for, and from a relatively quick scan it is pretty poor material even if visually appealing. Back to Tufte it is, then.




    13. not the easiest book to browse; but a good overview of how to display information. a variant and extension on tufte's thoughts.



    14. After the first chapters I felt I was encountering the same ideas only slightly restated. It did inspire me to re-read Tufte.


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