Bang Bang You're Dead

Bang Bang You're Dead

Louise Fitzhugh Sandra Scoppettone / Aug 22, 2019

Bang Bang You re Dead None

  • Title: Bang Bang You're Dead
  • Author: Louise Fitzhugh Sandra Scoppettone
  • ISBN: 9780060219147
  • Page: 497
  • Format: Hardcover
  • None

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      497 Louise Fitzhugh Sandra Scoppettone
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      Posted by:Louise Fitzhugh Sandra Scoppettone
      Published :2019-05-13T02:31:37+00:00

    About "Louise Fitzhugh Sandra Scoppettone"

      • Louise Fitzhugh Sandra Scoppettone

        Born in Memphis, Tennessee She attended Miss Hutchison s School and three different universities, without obtaining a degree According to her obituary in the New York Times, Fitzhugh graduated from Barnard College in 1950 She lived most of her adult life in New York City and had houses in both Long Island and Bridgewater, Connecticut.She was married briefly to Ed Thompson, whom she dated in high school After high school, she primarily dated women.Fitzhugh was the illustrator of the 1961 children s book Suzuki Beane, a parody of Eloise while Eloise lived in the Plaza, Suzuki was the daughter of beatnik parents and slept on a mattress on the floor of a Bleecker Street pad in Greenwich Village Fitzhugh worked closely with author Sandra Scoppettone to produce Suzuki Beane, which incorporated typewriter font and line drawings in an original way Although a parody of both Eloise and beatnik conceit, the book sprang to life as a genuine work of literature Today, it is a much sought after book on used book websites.Fitzhugh s best known book was Harriet the Spy, published in 1964 to some controversy since so many characters were far from admirable It has since become a classic As her New York Times obituary, published November 19, 1974, states The book helped introduce a new realism to children s fiction and has been widely imitated Harriet is the daughter of affluent New Yorkers who leave her in the care of her nanny, Ole Golly, in their Manhattan townhouse Hardly the feminine girl heroine typical of the early 1960s, Harriet is a writer who notes everything about everybody in her world in a notebook which ultimately falls into the wrong hands Ole Golly gives Harriet the unlikely but practical advice that Sometimes you have to lie But to yourself you must always tell the truth By and large, Harriet the Spy was well received it was awarded a New York Times Outstanding Book Award in 1964 and has sold 4 million copies since publication Two characters from the book, Beth Ellen and Sport, were featured in two of Fitzhugh s later books, The Long Secret and Sport The Long Secret deals fairly honestly with female puberty the main characters are pre teen girls who discuss how their changing bodies feel.Fitzhugh illustrated many of her books and had works exhibited in Banfer Gallery, New York, in 1963, among many other galleries.She died in 1974 of a brain aneurysm Her obituary was published in the New York Times.


    394 Comments

    1. This was first published in 1969 in response to the Vietnam War. It teaches through the use of childrens play that war hurts and in the end, there are no winners. I read this at 6 in 1974 and I still remember at the end of the battle one kid asks "Who won?" and the answer comes back "We all lost." That is a powerful message even 40 years later. Those who see only the war the kids fight and ignore their realization that war only hurts and how the two gangs reconcile and become friends are missing [...]


    2. I personally liked this book, however I have very mixed feelings about giving it to a child. The book tells the story of a group of boys who play a game called "Bang, Bang, You're Dead," acting out a battle. The fighting becomes real when they meet a rival group of boys that want to play on the same hill where they stage their battles. In the end, the boys don't like the real fighting, but decide to play fight with their rivals the next day. It's a mixed message, but it is very true to life. The [...]


    3. Bang Bang You’re Dead is a children’s book with detailed black and white drawings, about eight kids who have a war over a hill they want to play on. In the beginning we meet James and his three pals who dress up, take their toy guns to the top of a hill where they play a game called Bang Bang You’re Dead. In this game everyone gets (pretend) shot, everyone (pretend) dies, and no one gets hurt. At the end of each game they “celebrated the end of the war” which, one can tell from the ill [...]



    4. This was my favorite book as an elementary school student in the early 80s. Fantastic illustrations, lots of violence, and a good message---nobody wins when hostilities/conflicts become physical.


    5. This book was very violent and teaches a completely irrelevant, negative lesson that kids should never adapt. The illustrated cover and pages give the false pretense that it is an approachable graphic novel for readers of any age. In contrast, this book is disturbing on many levels and is an entry that should be avoided.




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