Everett Ruess: His Short Life, Mysterious Death, and Astonishing Afterlife

Everett Ruess: His Short Life, Mysterious Death, and Astonishing Afterlife

Philip L. Fradkin / Sep 17, 2019

Everett Ruess His Short Life Mysterious Death and Astonishing Afterlife Everett Ruess was twenty years old when he vanished into the canyonlands of southern Utah spawning the myth of a romantic desert wanderer that survives to this day It was and Ruess was in the f

  • Title: Everett Ruess: His Short Life, Mysterious Death, and Astonishing Afterlife
  • Author: Philip L. Fradkin
  • ISBN: 9780520265424
  • Page: 435
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Everett Ruess was twenty years old when he vanished into the canyonlands of southern Utah, spawning the myth of a romantic desert wanderer that survives to this day It was 1934, and Ruess was in the fifth year of a quest to record wilderness beauty in works of art whose value was recognized by such contemporary artists as Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Edward Weston FrEverett Ruess was twenty years old when he vanished into the canyonlands of southern Utah, spawning the myth of a romantic desert wanderer that survives to this day It was 1934, and Ruess was in the fifth year of a quest to record wilderness beauty in works of art whose value was recognized by such contemporary artists as Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and Edward Weston From his home in Los Angeles, Ruess walked, hitchhiked, and rode burros up the California coast, along the crest of the Sierra Nevada, and into the deserts of the Southwest In the first probing biography of Everett Ruess, acclaimed environmental historian Philip L Fradkin goes beyond the myth to reveal the realities of Ruess s short life and mysterious death and finds in the artist s astonishing afterlife a lonely hero who persevered.

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      Posted by:Philip L. Fradkin
      Published :2019-06-19T04:14:18+00:00

    About "Philip L. Fradkin"

      • Philip L. Fradkin

        Philip L Fradkin is an American environmentalist historian, journalist and author Fradkin has authored books ranging from Alaska, California and Nevada, with topics ranging from water conservation, earthquakes, and nuclear weapons.In 2005, Fradkin was given the Californiana Award by the Commonwealth Club of California.


    556 Comments

    1. I have completely mixed and strong feelings about this book. First, it is about one of my inspirations and a remarkable young man who is legendary in the Southwest. While much of the reporting is solid the author (now deceased) inserts himself into the story over and over again. It feels and reads unprofessionally and the opinions he offers detract from the tone and the veracity of the author. He decides, on his own, that Ruess was a bipolar homosexual and yet scolds other authors for their spec [...]


    2. Quit halfway through, though I blame my own lack of fortitude. Couldn't reconnect with the subject's gentle, artistic nature after he stole a puppy, then beat it until it ran away. We all "contain multitudes," blah blah blah.



    3. I had not heard of Everett Ruess until a few years ago when I read David Roberts's book about him based on a recommendation in High Country News. Everett's story was riveting so I jumped at the chance to read more about his life and subsequent mythic status that developed around him following his disappearance in 1934. His remains have never been found.While I found this book very interesting, it tended to be a bit darker than the previous one focusing more on his family and upbringing, his ment [...]


    4. I gave up about half-way through this book. The writing style was okay and it wasn't that the book wasn't interesting. I just found myself getting more and more disgusted with the selfish nature of this young man and didn't really care that much.


    5. A very interesting look into another wanderer that had the artistic ability to overcome the lonliness to some degree . . . I really liked how Fradkin interspersed Ruess' own words with his own to tell the story.


    6. Really enjoyed this - such an intriguing, typically American story. Due out in September - starred review in Library Journal here: bit/jU8yc6 (scroll down)


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