The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza

The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza

Eyal Weizman / Jan 24, 2020

The Least of All Possible Evils Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza The principle of the lesser evil the acceptability of pursuing one exceptional course of action in order to prevent a greater injustice has long been a cornerstone of Western ethical philosophy From i

  • Title: The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza
  • Author: Eyal Weizman
  • ISBN: 9781844676477
  • Page: 243
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The principle of the lesser evil the acceptability of pursuing one exceptional course of action in order to prevent a greater injustice has long been a cornerstone of Western ethical philosophy From its roots in classical ethics and Christian theology, to Hannah Arendt s exploration of the work of the Jewish Councils during the Nazi regime, Weizman explores its developmThe principle of the lesser evil the acceptability of pursuing one exceptional course of action in order to prevent a greater injustice has long been a cornerstone of Western ethical philosophy From its roots in classical ethics and Christian theology, to Hannah Arendt s exploration of the work of the Jewish Councils during the Nazi regime, Weizman explores its development in three key transformations of the problem the defining intervention of M decins Sans Fronti res in mid 1980s Ethiopia the separation wall in Israel Palestine and international and human rights law in Bosnia, Gaza and Iraq Drawing on a wealth of new research, Weizman charts the latest manifestation of this age old idea In doing so he shows how military and political intervention acquired a new humanitarian acceptability and legality in the late twentieth and early twenty first centuries.

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      Published :2019-03-23T07:16:43+00:00

    About "Eyal Weizman"

      • Eyal Weizman

        Eyal Weizman Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza book, this is one of the most wanted Eyal Weizman author readers around the world.


    341 Comments

    1. I recommend it to everyone. Eyal Weizman's continued his research on the issues of human rights and Forensic Architecture in occupied Palestine after the conflict of 2008-2009. This book can be a continuation of his last work: "Hollow Land: Israel's Architecture of Occupation"


    2. Among the most fascinating and disturbing books I have ever read. My Kindle edition now has a handful of notes that are simply swear words, but few books have made me think as much.


    3. An odd, muddled book that has a great point about institutional capture buried in its dense musings.Weizman details how the best of intentions of humanitarian work can be utilized and become essential to the execution of cruel acts. Weizman lays out the origins of the debate and situates it, as many of these discussions end up, in Hannah Arendt's thought. He lays out her argument that complete resistance is better than mitigating harm within the oppressive system because then that oppressive sys [...]



    4. Speaks to much of what ails contemporary politics (or rather lack thereof) throughout the world. Exposes the Panglossian side of "just war theory" and the dangers of "665" thinking. A must read (especially for Americans) in an era of lesser evilism.


    5. An account of the 'humanitarian present' and how we buy into the concept of lesser evil for the good of many, following the words of St. Augustine and Pangloss in Voltaire's 'Candide.' Specifically, it deals with the spaces of refugees and how they become epistemic spaces (for the media to broadcast) and sites of violence, rather than safe spaces which can eventually hold on its own. (I enjoyed the problematization of spatial configurations during times of conflict, and would be greatly interest [...]



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