Rise of the Videogame Zinesters: How Freaks, Normals, Amateurs, Artists, Dreamers, Drop-outs, Queers, Housewives, and People Like You Are Taking Back an Art Form

Rise of the Videogame Zinesters: How Freaks, Normals, Amateurs, Artists, Dreamers, Drop-outs, Queers, Housewives, and People Like You Are Taking Back an Art Form

Anna Anthropy / Dec 09, 2019

Rise of the Videogame Zinesters How Freaks Normals Amateurs Artists Dreamers Drop outs Queers Housewives and People Like You Are Taking Back an Art Form Part critical essay part manifesto part DIY guide and altogether unprecedented Rise of the Videogame Zinesters shows why the multi billion dollar videogame industry needs to change and how a new g

  • Title: Rise of the Videogame Zinesters: How Freaks, Normals, Amateurs, Artists, Dreamers, Drop-outs, Queers, Housewives, and People Like You Are Taking Back an Art Form
  • Author: Anna Anthropy
  • ISBN: 9781609803728
  • Page: 335
  • Format: Paperback
  • Part critical essay, part manifesto, part DIY guide, and altogether unprecedented, Rise of the Videogame Zinesters shows why the multi billion dollar videogame industry needs to change and how a new generation of artists can change it Indie game designer extraordinaire Anna Anthropy makes an ardent plea for the industry to move beyond the corporate systems of production aPart critical essay, part manifesto, part DIY guide, and altogether unprecedented, Rise of the Videogame Zinesters shows why the multi billion dollar videogame industry needs to change and how a new generation of artists can change it Indie game designer extraordinaire Anna Anthropy makes an ardent plea for the industry to move beyond the corporate systems of production and misogynistic culture and to support games that represent a wider variety of human experiences Rise of the Videogame Zinesters is a call to arms for anyone who s ever dreamed of making their own games Anna s guide to game design encourages budding designers to bring their unique backgrounds and experiences to their creations and widen the playing field of an industry that has for too long catered to an adolescent male consumer base Anna s newest game, Dys4ia, an autobiographical game about her experiences with hormone replacement therapy, has been featured in The Penny Arcade, IndieGames, and TigSource.

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      Published :2019-09-25T03:18:42+00:00

    About "Anna Anthropy"

      • Anna Anthropy

        i write smut, pulp fiction, and life changing books about the decentralization of access to the means to create art also, i make games.


    576 Comments

    1. Okay! This book is half essential manifesto, half terrible. So, three stars?The good: Chapters 4-7, plus the appendices, wherein the author makes the case that video games are in need of revolution, and that that revolution is in the same way zines brought it to publishing: everyone creating, everyone sharing, everyone evolving. (And everyone getting to tell their own stories.)This is solid, emotional, and excellent stuff. And it also is backed up by the appendices, which give examples of the t [...]


    2. Functional as a manifesto, otherwise a little short on argument. Anthropy's solution to the problems in games seem to be that everyone should be working alone, for free, on stories that express their innermost whatever. That's a nice idea, but folks also gotta pay the bills. And we don't all want to play these same kind of weird meta-critical games, either. Not exclusively, anyway. I would have also liked to see a deeper discussion of the labor issues inherent in the current games development sy [...]


    3. 2 stars? 3 stars? Fuck stars, whatever. There are things I like about this book: what it's trying to say, what it *does* say, the few passages I highlighted in the instances where Anthropy says them very well and very clearly. I wish it dug into things more deeply (the state of video game development, the worker burn out and how, exactly, that is influencing the games like it's claimed, or the ways in which games can force a person to embrace a political ideology and the consequences of that) bu [...]


    4. As a manifesto, it's really good. Inspirational, witty, interesting. Even with some aggression towards the popular game making "one percent", the book is far from whimpering and criticising. Many manifestos I've read were about how bad our world is. This one is quite the opposite: it's a story about how you can try and create something the way you probably never considered seriously. Something relevant for you. And about people who have been doing exactly that, with very interesting results.And [...]


    5. One of the most inspiring books I've read in a long time. Anna's book is part manifesto about why games matter--they foster empathy and can be utilized in sharing experiences--and part how-to guide on creating personalized, small-scale videogames that buck the homogeneous, corporate-made publishing model that the industry relies on. It was one of the most inspiring books I've read in a long time. I really want to make a game now! I was thinking of writing a piece of interactive fiction in Twine. [...]


    6. p 137-139What to Make a Game About?Your dog, your cat, your child, your boyfriend, your girlfriend, your mother, your father, your grandmother, your friends, your imaginary friends, your summer vacation, your winter in the mountains, your childhood at home, your current home, your future home, your first job, your worst job, the job you wish you had.Your first date, your first kiss, your first fuck, your first true love, your second true love, your relationship, your kinks, your deepest secrets, [...]


    7. This book, which reads more like a loaded editorial than an analysis on gaming culture is a frustrating read. To begin, I was asked to read the book as part of an introductory course on video game history that was half analysis of the medium, and half game creation. Otherwise I wouldn't have bothered to buy or even finish this book. Anthropy does everything right as far as encouraging players to take advantage of little known sources like twine, or larger platforms like gamemaker to create, well [...]


    8. If you're interested in games and game-making, this book does a great job of offering some perspective on possibilities. You can start small, it is easier than ever, their are people you can find that are doing the same. She has some axes to grind that I don't, but I understand where she's coming from and that didn't get in the way of her message coming through clearly. And the appendices and guides to various tools -- sure they will age fast, but are great at pointing you in a direction to make [...]


    9. I'm not the target audience for this book. I play a lot of games, I've tried making them before, and I read Anna Anthropy's blog regularly. This book is probably for people who aren't so sure about this whole video game business, as it spends a lot of time talking about how games are usually made, and why that's a problem. The book talks about themes in games, and how limited they sometimes are, and how expansive they can be.For the most part, I knew all this stuff already. But the last chapter [...]


    10. The Garage bands of the 60s and the punk bands of the 70s proved that anyone and a few friends can become musicians. Disposable and instant cameras allowed anyone to become a photographer. Camcorders and camera phones turned anyone into a filmmaker. Paper and ink, and later typewriters and computers, made everyone a potential writer. Crayons and fingerpaintwell, you get the point. Making an art form accessible and its tools widely available does a lot for the art. It demystifies the way things a [...]


    11. Hezký, i pro lidi co hry moc nehrajou. Manifest/přehled o nezávislých autobiografických hrách, včetně spousty tipů triků a příběhů jak si svou malou hru udělat. Motivační. I když se doba od roku 2012 docela posunula, hlavní výtky vůči hernímu průmyslu, které Anthropy vznáší, platí pořád. Uzavřenost, nediverzita a toxické pracovní prostředí. Díky webům jako itch se to naštěstí hodně mění. Tak si to přečtěte a běžte svou hru taky udělat!


    12. I enjoyed this book. It was unique and has me interested in making my own games. Also I tried some of the mentioned games and am glad for the opportunity to experience different gaming perspectives.



    13. I recently finished [Anna Anthropy](auntiepixelante/)'s book [*Rise of the Video Game Zinesters: How Freaks, Normals, Amateurs, Artists, Dreamers, Drop-outs, Queers, Housewives, and People Like You Are Taking Back an Art Form*](amazon/Rise-Videogame-Z). The book acts as a manifesto and roadmap to democratized game-making with an as-close-to-zero-as-possible skill barrier. Anna argues that this is what is necessary for games to be expressive and individual. *Zinesters* was an enjoyable read that [...]


    14. If there was one thing I could say about this book, it's that it's worth a read.I'm currently a student studying English and computer science with the desire to pursue a career in game design. So, naturally, this book caught my eye (how couldn't it; do you see that awesome title??). Anna Anthropy, the author of this book, offers a lot of encouraging words, and has some amazing points to make. The book, however, it not perfect. A few things annoyed me about it that I feel like are worth mentionin [...]


    15. Rise of the Videogame Zinesters is, like the title says, an account of how games are finally a medium for the masses and no longer the exclusive product of big corporations and strict publisher-developer business models. It's a good thing that this is happening, and it's great that author Anna Anthropy recognized that this movement needs more people to both document and champion it. This book, in a mere 208 pages, isa short history of games and their makers,a declaration of independence,a person [...]


    16. This short, provocative book by a noted developer is partly a simple introduction to making your own video games, and partly a manifesto which calls for broader representation in games through making them easier for individuals to make as a form of self-expression. Its arguments are well-cited and compelling, though it hardly purports to be totally objective; indeed, the author makes it pretty clear that it mostly comes from her own experiences as an alienated player of titles which have clearly [...]


    17. This book is a great inspirational piece to the aspiring game creator, especially if they don't know where to go.It delves into the need for games to feel unique in terms of being personal experiences, it talks about the author's history with personal game creation, about how big companies are essentially rehashing the same game over and over across new IPs, and about how it's still possible to create this art form in a concise but essential way. The number one message here is just to get out an [...]


    18. I wouldn't go so far as to call it a manifesto, but Antropy's book is definitely edging toward screed in her argument supporting the development of homebrew, indie-made games. Her model for how she would like to see games work is the zine: intensely personal for the author, creative, cheap and easy to make, easy to distribute in low levels. The book is divided into eight chapters. She starts by talking about what's wrong with the videogame industry: essentially, that it puts industry before vide [...]


    19. what a fabulous little book for people who don't program, love games, and want to make their ownrt screed, part practical advice, this little gem will help you alter the way you think about videogames as an experience. like a lot of over-15 gamers, i adore games but often cannot find anything i want to play if i'm not in the mood to shoot something, put an arrow in it, slice it in half with a sword, zap it to cinder with my magical electrical powers, burn it up with my fire spells you get the id [...]


    20. I think Anna Anthropy's has done great work in spreading a sort of punk rock DIY mentality to game creation, and her articles and interviews are always a treat. I found this book to be curiously lacking in passion and depth, however. The title (and statements she's made in interviews, etc.) made me expect an inspirational manifesto, but while the book was logically structured and informative, it lacked much in the way of impact. There wasn't much about people "taking back an art form," instead t [...]


    21. For the purpose it serves, this book is unique and deserves a good amount of appreciation for what it brings to the table. It greatly benefits from Anna's liberating perspective, which is fresh and inspiring for anyone who spends a fair amount of time thinking about video games. The text does slightly suffer from repetition, but I never really found it distracting. The best part for me was discovering the actual "zinester" games included in the book and being inspired by the creativity and perso [...]


    22. While there's a good deal of ideology intertwined in the book (and I don't even mean the author's insistance of using "her" and "she" exclusively, when referring to developers and players, or the linguistic slant when referring to her partner - those bothered me a bit, but shouldn't, really, so that's not my criticism - I refer to painting indie creators as saviours of the medium, while corporations get thrown into a single bag labeled "ScumBag" which I don't necessarily disagree with most of th [...]


    23. The title probably makes this book appear more inaccessible (or unappealing?) to complete normies than it needs to be, especially considering the important message of video-games-as-art inside the pages, but that teeny-tiny gripe aside,* I liked this book a bunch.I learned some new things about the history of video games. Having lived through the Super Nintendo and every iteration of games in-between, I thought I knew how they've gotten to this point, but Anna Anthropy pointed out some key momen [...]


    24. The contents are mostly good, with some caveats. There's the strong flavour of "indie=good", "AAA=bad", and the idea that it's a zero sum game that the two branches can never co-exist. There are implications that a Japanese developed fantasy game has to have a default white character, solely because the character did not have the extra racial stereotypes to be marked as Asian. And as someone who really do not like Stirling's writing, I found that shoehorning the 2010 era feud without mentioning [...]


    25. 1) ''What to Make a Game About? [] Your past lives, your future lives, lies that you've told, lies you plan to tell, lies, truths, grim visions, prophecy, wishes, wants, loves, hates, premonitions, warnings, fables, adages, myths, legends, stories, diary entries.Jumping over a pit, jumping into a pool, jumping into the sky and never coming down.Anything. Everything.''2) ''Do all of this again, using what you've learned from your first game. Make an entirely different game, use an entirely differ [...]


    26. A surprisingly practical guide to developing independent videogames and a convincing argument for more diversity in the industry. "Taking back an art form" is not exactly it, though, because the change is a first -- it's about how a whitebread crew of young white males has mutated into a colorful and diverse audience of players and makers of every background, a group utterly new to the mainstream scene and often in direct conflict with the old guard. That's the meat of the issue and the heart of [...]


    27. This was a very informative and fun-to-read book about DIY video games, and the author's opinion on their place in the rise of purely-digital culture. After a little history about herself and her experience in creating games, she gives a very simple break down of what makes a game (digital or analog), short examples of other self-published games, and her viewpoint of DIY games as the zines of the future. Although a lot of the history of games and the author's ambivalence of "AAA" games could be [...]


    28. Some people have questioned the tagline that describes this as a 'manifesto' or 'critical essay', which is justifiable. But I don't care too much about that. It has some great observations that most gamers probably don't think about; for me, it was the commentary on subverting what the designer intended by creating new rules which I recall fondly during 'shotgun relay' sessions of Gears of War online (ironically meat-head marine murder simulators such as Gears are something the author rallies ag [...]


    29. I have this book to thank for solidifying in my mind the idea that games are the perfect artistic medium to express complex ideas. Previously any connection that I'd made between art and games had to do with graphics or animation. Those are still important components, but the game as a whole is a piece of art, and can only be fully appreciated by being played. On a personal level, I found sudden harmony between my desire to create and my desire to play.While I found the greatest value of this bo [...]


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