BEAST: Biological Evolutionary Animal Simulation Test

BEAST: Biological Evolutionary Animal Simulation Test

Charles Eric Maine / Jan 18, 2020

BEAST Biological Evolutionary Animal Simulation Test What Mark Harland finds at the secret biological research laboratory is much basic and frightening than a minor breach of security And what happens when B E A S T becomes a beast and breaks loose fro

  • Title: BEAST: Biological Evolutionary Animal Simulation Test
  • Author: Charles Eric Maine
  • ISBN: 9780340028636
  • Page: 479
  • Format: Paperback
  • What Mark Harland finds at the secret biological research laboratory is much basic and frightening than a minor breach of security And what happens when B.E.A.S.T becomes a beast, and breaks loose from its magnetic tape, is something which Harland has to handle on a catch as catch can basis, until the whole thing explodes into violence and perversion with Harland ouWhat Mark Harland finds at the secret biological research laboratory is much basic and frightening than a minor breach of security And what happens when B.E.A.S.T becomes a beast, and breaks loose from its magnetic tape, is something which Harland has to handle on a catch as catch can basis, until the whole thing explodes into violence and perversion with Harland out on a very loose and long limb.

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      Posted by:Charles Eric Maine
      Published :2019-01-06T23:11:06+00:00

    About "Charles Eric Maine"

      • Charles Eric Maine

        Charles Eric Maine pseudonym of David McIlwain 21 January 1921 30 November 1981 was an English science fiction writer whose most prominent works were published in the 1950s and 1960s His stories were thrillers that dealt with new scientific technologyBiographyMcIlwain was born in Liverpool.He published three issues of a science fiction magazine called The Satellite which he co edited along with J F Burke From 1940 to 1941, he published his own magazine called Gargoyle.During World War II, he was in the Royal Air Force and served in Northern Africa in 1943.After the war, he worked in TV engineering, and became involved in editorial work with radio and TV During 1952, he sold his first radio play, Spaceways, to the BBC Due to its popularity, it became a novel as well as a movie.One of his best known stories, Timeliner, was about a scientist who experiments with a time machine, only to be maliciously thrust into the future by a fellow scientist who was having an affair with his wife It was originally written as a radio play known as The Einstein Highway.He died in London in 1981.Bibliography Spaceways 1953 Variant Title Spaceways Satellite Timeliner 1955 Escapement 1956 Variant Title The Man Who Couldn t Sleep High Vacuum 1956 The Tide Went Out 1958 Revised in 1997 with Variant Title Thirst World Without Men 1958 Revised in 1972 with Variant Title Alph Count Down 1959 Variant Title Fire Past the Future Crisis 2000 1959 Subterfuge 1959 Calculated Risk 1960 He Owned the World 1960 Variant Title The Man Who Owned the World The Mind of Mr Soames 1961 The Darkest of Nights 1962 Variant Title Survival Margin B.E.A.S.T 1966 Alph 1972


    894 Comments


    1. B.E.A.S.T. deals with some interesting ideas for the early 1960s -- the idea of "Virtual Life" 30+ years before it became commonplace, the stereotype of computer nerds as sexually repressed freaks -- but ultimately goes nowhere. The super-spy narrator is sent to investigate a computer lab where the chief programmer has become obsessed with speed-evolving a virtual ecosystem (an idea possibly taken from the 1964 Outer Limits episode "Wolf 359"?) and talking to the "ultimate lifeform" that develop [...]


    2. After reading "Timeliner" by the same author, this book was for me a bit of a disappoint. It is well written, intriguing and manages to built up an interesting atmosphere around the places where the story is happening. But it lacks in my opinion a deeper analysis of the issues, and also a more meaningful resolution.


    3. This is the second and last of the two Charles Eric Maine novels I have (and will ever) read. The other was Alph (also known as World Without Men). There is a certain competence to the prose, but his unrelenting misogynism grates after a very short while.


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