Uncle Remus Stories

Uncle Remus Stories

Marion Palmer / Dec 09, 2019

Uncle Remus Stories Walt Disney Adaptations of the original tales by Joel Chandler Harris

  • Title: Uncle Remus Stories
  • Author: Marion Palmer
  • ISBN: 9780307655516
  • Page: 410
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 23 Walt Disney Adaptations of the original tales by Joel Chandler Harris

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      Posted by:Marion Palmer
      Published :2019-09-20T03:22:33+00:00

    About "Marion Palmer"

      • Marion Palmer

        Marion Palmer Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Uncle Remus Stories book, this is one of the most wanted Marion Palmer author readers around the world.


    963 Comments

    1. My mother would read this book and had a different voice for each of the characters. I was mesmerized. Her voice, coupled with the vivid illustrations, would transport me to far away places. She brought Br'er Fox, Br'er Rabbit and Br'er Bear to life. She gave due respect to the old southern vernacular, and never hesitated to read it as written. She is responsible for my true love of a story, well told. I would give all that I have to hear her read it, one more time.


    2. I'm also a Uncle Remus fan and one of the best collections was the one Disney put out. Although it is now very hard to find in good shape keep a look out they are out there. Brair Rabbit and his friends were some of the first characters that started my love for reading. So, although it is definitely now PC, thank you Uncle Remus.


    3. It will never cease to amuse me that with all the politically correct drivel surrounding this book and movie, (I had to get the Japanese dubbed version to find this movie!!!) The lady running the Uncle Remus Museum in NC is African American, wearing a headscarf, and quite proud of all the stories.


    4. I have very fond memories of these being read to me as a child.I loved the dialect and vernacular vocabulary. These are stories that definitely should be read aloud--but not just anyone can do it; or at least not do it well. It's actually very difficult to read if you're not already somewhat familiar with old time Southern dialect. I also fondly remember my grandmother taking me to see the re-release of the great Disney movie adaptation, Song of the South. I think I even had a picture book based [...]


    5. One of my favorite childhood story books. I would pick a different "tale" every night and my mother would perform different voices for all of the characters. Actually, this is the ONLY book I can remember being read aloud over and over again. I know it wasn't the only one, but it is the only one that stuck. Sometime during my teens it got lost during a move. When I noticed it didn't make it to our new home, I was upset but when I had my first child almost 17 years ago I really started to panic a [...]


    6. This was my first book ever. It was given to me as a present when I was about a year or 2 old. I made up stories from the illustrations until I was finally able to read it myself. Definitely brings back memories to find it here.


    7. Re-releases of the 1946 Disney cartoon movie "Song of the South" popularized these tales when I was a kid. I even portrayed Br'er Rabbit in a Cub Scouts dramatic production of "Br'er Rabbit and the Tar Baby" at a pack meeting in 1955 or thereabouts.



    8. I remember my Dad reading me Brer Rabbit when I was little and he would do the best voices for the stories it was great!!!




    9. This is the book that my dad would read to us as children. Written in vernacular. It is WONDERFUL and should be read aloud; preferably to your children :)



    10. I have very fond memories of these being read to me as a child.I loved the dialect and vernacular vocabulary. These are stories that definitely should be read aloud--but not just anyone can do it; or at least not do it well. It's actually very difficult to read if you're not already somewhat familiar with old time Southern dialect. I also fondly remember my grandmother taking me to see the re-release of the great Disney movie adaptation, Song of the South. I think I even had a picture book based [...]


    11. I so loved these stories as a kid. As an adult, I am well aware of the implicit racism that the Uncle Remus character and his stories represent, but I still think there is much to value about the core tales. There is much to learn and teach our children about how American culture has changed and evolved throughout our history; the Uncle Remus stories can be a good tool for illustrating how original African American stories were collected, changed, and re-packaged for white audiences. I do tell m [...]


    12. Ah, here are the good stories. Those other Disney versions I was reading were really, really awful. Just not good at all. I have read the originals at some point too, though I'm not sure how many of them I read. This version is great. The illustrations are nice and not too cartoony, and the original stories are captured very well. The way these stories are told remind me of The Magic Pudding -- goofy animals all tricking and going after each other. The way it's told makes it so silly that I don' [...]


    13. 2 stars solely for the illustrations, which were enjoyable.But no amount of lovely illustration can make this anything but incredibly racist- it boils down to Joel Chandler Harris, a white man who apparently felt slavery was a lovely thing, took Black stories and made his name and profit off of them. I must soon read Alice Walker's essay "Uncle Remus, No Friend of Mine" because reading that balance is especially important to me, given I'm from Eatonton, GA- where both Harris and Walker hale from [...]


    14. I think the illustrations drew my son to this book. And maybe the fact that it is mine from childhood, a gift from his grandfather who grew up with the tales as well.Reading this aloud is an exercise in double auto-editing: once to convert the dialect into standard grammar and pronunciation, and the second time to omit the racism and harsh language.Is there something built into humans that makes us drawn to cautionary tales of tricksters? I wonder why Disney hasn't made a movie version. "Don't t [...]


    15. Though this book can be controversial because it is written in a dialect of early American slaves, I have fond memories of sitting on my father's lap as he stumbled through it using the African-American inflection. I now own both this book and the modern version of Uncle Remus Stories and read both to my class of 1st & 2nd graders, most of them enjoyed the old version better. It turned out to be a good lesson in learning about other cultures within the American culture along with enjoying th [...]


    16. Found a 1946 edition while reading Joel Chandler Harris' original, problematic stories. In his introduction, Walt Disney himself states: "after much consideration, we have been forced to conclude that this dialect is much too difficult for the majority of modern, young readers. For this reason, we have greatly simplified it, although with regret that we had to alter it at all." Thinking about this book alongside more contemporary adaptations is worth considering, as well as comparing these stori [...]


    17. My grandfather would tell us these stories before I could read. I loved when he took parts and made them come alive. When I was able to read it was one we would sit together and read. He would help me read along with him and it made the stories even more real for me. It is a book I wish I still owned. I would read it all over again. I need to find a copy.


    18. Loved, loved, loved these stories as a kid. "Brer Fox, PLEASE don't throw me in that briar patch." and "Tar Baby, sits and don't say nothing." are two of my favorite quotes. I really need to find a copy of this for the boys. Later in life, I came upon an original copy as written by Chandler. This was one case in which I was glad of Walt Disney's sanitizing the language.


    19. Maybe this says a lot about my mother and me, I don't know, but the first book I remember my Mom reading to me was The Tar Baby story from Uncle Remus. She did the best voices ever! It's been way too long since I've read these stories, but I still remember Brer Rabbit and Brer Bear and Brer Fox and the turtle and all the great stories.


    20. In 5th grade, my granddaughter was learning about colloquial language. She was scratching her head at the teacher's explanation. I brushed the cobwebs off my Walt Disney version and began to read. Uncle Remus had a perfect voice and wonderful tales to tell in the most all-out colloquial ever spoken by man.


    21. Stories from another time and place, no longer fashionably acceptable, about Br'er Rabbit outsmarting his adversaries, Br'er Fox and Br'er Brear. What did the word Br'er mean; 'briar', refering to the briar patch or 'brother'?


    22. This is one of my most beloved books. I was read this book as a child, and had to have my own copy as an adult. I love the language used in these stories. I read this now to my own children sometimes.


    23. This is one of the few books that has survived from my childhood, though it's cover is tattered, and the spine coming apart. Loved, loved, loved it as a kid. Who can forget the Tar Baby story? Or Brer rabbit getting thrown in the briar patch? Now I love to read it, accents and all, to my kids.


    24. This was a favorite bedtime story book when I was young. Br'er Rabbit is smart, fast, and sassy, easily outfoxing Br'er Fox. Sometimes he's defending the helpless, and sometimes he's just a thief, but these stories are always entertaining.




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