Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust

Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust

Leanne Lieberman / Oct 20, 2019

Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust Lauren Yanofsky doesn t want to be Jewish any Her father a noted Holocaust historian keeps giving her Holocaust memoirs to read and her mother doesn t understand why Lauren hates the idea of Jewish

  • Title: Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust
  • Author: Leanne Lieberman
  • ISBN: 9781459801097
  • Page: 275
  • Format: Paperback
  • Lauren Yanofsky doesn t want to be Jewish any Her father, a noted Holocaust historian, keeps giving her Holocaust memoirs to read, and her mother doesn t understand why Lauren hates the idea of Jewish youth camps and family vacations to Holocaust memorials But when Lauren sees some of her friends including Jesse, a cute boy she likes playing Nazi war games, she isLauren Yanofsky doesn t want to be Jewish any Her father, a noted Holocaust historian, keeps giving her Holocaust memoirs to read, and her mother doesn t understand why Lauren hates the idea of Jewish youth camps and family vacations to Holocaust memorials But when Lauren sees some of her friends including Jesse, a cute boy she likes playing Nazi war games, she is faced with a terrible choice betray her friends or betray her heritage.Told with engaging humor, Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust isn t simply about making tough moral choices It s about a smart, funny, passionate girl caught up in the turmoil of bad hair days, family friction, changing friendships, love and, yes, the Holocaust.

    • ↠ Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust || Þ PDF Read by ✓ Leanne Lieberman
      275 Leanne Lieberman
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust || Þ PDF Read by ✓ Leanne Lieberman
      Posted by:Leanne Lieberman
      Published :2019-07-18T02:53:55+00:00

    About "Leanne Lieberman"

      • Leanne Lieberman

        Leanne Lieberman is the author of five YA books including Gravity a Sydney Taylor Notable Book , and Lauren Yanofsky Hates The Holocaust Her latest YA book is The Most Dangerous Thing, about a girl who coping with depression and anxiety Leanne also writes adult fiction and is working on a novel entitled Unsettled Leanne is a graduate of The University of Windsor s MA in in Creative Writing Originally from Vancouver BC, Leanne now lives in Kingston ON with her husband and two sons.


    345 Comments

    1. That is quite a title, isn't it. I know I did a double take when I first saw it. So, what kind of a kid would say she hates the Holocaust? Meet Lauren Yanofsky. Lauren is entering her junior year of high school, has a big crush on Jesse, a boy she has known most of her life, and is finding her best friend drifting away. Oh, yes, and Lauren has also decided not to be Jewish anymore. Lauren had always felt that her religion was full of persecution in the Bible and history. Then, three years ago, s [...]


    2. The writing in this book was engaging, but I have trouble understanding what point the author wanted me to take away from this. Much of the moral dilemma was facile, too many of the characters were one-dimensional, and the ending resolved nothing - except that if a boy is cute he can be forgiven pretty much anything. There were things to like in here, like a semi-realistic portrayal of friends growing apart, but ultimately I struggled to find a worthwhile point to all the hand-wringing.



    3. I just finished reading this book and still don’t understand why the author wrote it. As a story about friendships that evolve during high school, it would have been an okay book, but I believe – from the title – the author wanted to convey a message about the Holocaust, anti-Semitism, or another Jewish topic and that, in no way, was successfully accomplished. Fortunately I only wasted about two hours of reading time.


    4. This book with the irreverent, controversial title is really about a young teenage girl searching for her true identity. There’s nothing unusual about that theme in young adult literature, the difference for our heroine, Lauren Yanofsky is that she is the daughter of a father who is a Holocaust professor and so her world has been awash with these horrific images since childhood.Her father"s specialty certainly has made it difficult for a sensitive young girl to grow up without being warped. Pa [...]


    5. Praise for Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust by Leanne LiebermanWhen I first learned the title of Leanne Lieberman’s new novel, I was first put off and thought that I would probably not like Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust. However, after reading the novel, I have changed my opinion and think that the title is a brilliant idea and it may also attract readers who have no interest in learning about the Holocaust.There are several interesting themes in this novel - all issues that junior an [...]


    6. [image error]Due to copy and paste, formatting has been lost.Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust was an interesting read, but it wasn't all that I hoped it would be. I guess that I just expected it to be more profound, or for it to beI don't know, just more? In the end, I liked this one but I didn't love it. The ending was a little too abrupt, and the character relationships could have been better. But those are the only problems that I had!I liked that the focus of this book seemed to be growin [...]


    7. Lauren Yanofsky is a lively teen learning to come to terms with her Jewish identity. It's an up and down proposition because her father is a academic specializing in the Holocaust, and her whole life has been defined by Hebrew School and other activities expected of compliant Jewish children - Bat Mitzvahs, Jewish youth groups, synagogue activities. As any self respecting teen does, she rebels and insists on attending public school where she becomes friends with people who are pretty unaware of [...]


    8. librarytalker/201All her life, Lauren Yanofsky has had to deal with her cultural history. Her dad is a Holocaust historian and often shares his knowledge with her. Her family is Jewish and sends her to Jewish camp every summer where stories about past atrocities are taught.Lauren just can't seem to get away from the Holocaust.She privately declares to herself that she's no longer Jewish, though she's not sure how to truly de-convert. She leans on her friends for support and tries to live as non- [...]


    9. "Some kids got Disney. I got Hitler." No way could I NOT read this book after reading that line on the back cover--and the title intrigued me as well. The novel's protagonist, Lauren, doesn't want to be Jewish any more. It's not that she wants to be a different religion--she just wants to be a "non-Jew by choice." She grew up going to Jewish day school; her father's a Holocaust historian. At her house, she quips, every day was Holocaust Remembrance Day. Family vacations (instead of going to Disn [...]


    10. I appreciate this book for what it's intended. It brings up a lot of important topics around religion, finding your own identity in it and just exploring different aspects of what it means to the MC to be Jewish. I think it's the book that deals the most about religion that I've read without ever sounding preachy and I appreciate the questions it brings forward about religion and heritage.However, as a story, I felt I couldn't really connect to the MC. Lauren had some serious communication issue [...]


    11. I think that I'd really like to give this 2.5 or 2.75 stars, but again, no real way to do that on here, so bumped up it is. Leanne Lieberman's title is one of the best things about this book, since it makes you do a double-take and might even draw a few reluctant readers to it. There were positives and negatives to the book that pretty muched equaled out to be a decent read. Positives: Lauren and her friends seem real enough, it's not a "typical" (if there is such a thing) Holocaust book, Lauren [...]


    12. Lieberman, Leanne. Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust. Lauren Yanofsky has decided not to be Jewish anymore. She does not want to participate in any religious activities with her family, does not attend the Jewish youth group with her friends, and especially doesn't want to hear any more about the Holocaust. Lauren has decided to ignore her Jewish heritage and try to be normal, when one day some of her friends decide to play a war game involving water guns and swastika armbands, and suddenly La [...]


    13. Lauren Yanofsky is a typical and funny sixteen year old starting her junior year of high school. She’s getting ready for the upcoming basketball season, crushing on the boy next door, and trying to figure out why her best friend is pulling away from her. She’s also dealing with a pretty major identity issue: she doesn’t want to be Jewish anymore. As someone who attended Hebrew school until high school and who’s family is very involved at their temple, this is a Big. Deal. Lauren’s choi [...]


    14. This book added up to more than the sum of its parts. The cover art and jacket copy are okay but nothing special, certainly not up to the standard set by the provocative, witty title. I worried this story would be pretty heavy-handed, as Tolerance is a good thing for young people to learn about and all. It's not heavy-handed at all. It's a fun, plot-driven teen novel with likable characters getting into the usual adolescent troubles--dating, smoking, fights with parents, and, oh yeah, the Holoca [...]


    15. From the novel’s first page about Lauren Yanofsky’s first day at grade eleven in a public school, this gripping tale is a page turner of enthralling events, vividly portrayed characters and teenage growing pains, a book that captivates young adults, as well as the not-so-young adults. The novel is all the more riveting because it brings out through its interesting and unusual plot the emotional struggles of Lauren who has regarded her Jewish upbringing and the all too frequent recounts of th [...]


    16. Lauren Yanofsky Hates the Holocaust because it has a tendency to take over her life. The daughter of a Holocaust historian and devout Jewish parents, Lauren can't seem to escape the discussions of the horrors of the Jewish people. And she's tired of it. Tired of feeling like her culture has the market on tragedy. Lauren is a teenager struggling with identity is many ways, but all of which bring us closer to her and leave us hoping that she finds a balance. Balance with her family. Balance with h [...]


    17. Okay, I abandoned this book because the main character/narrator got really annoyed. I mean, super annoying. So annoying to the point that all I could remember about this book is this: Jews, Jews, Holocaust, death, and that's pretty much it. It's as bad as reading Ernst Hemingway (I think that's his name) and his book about bells, bells, bells. That's all I remember about that book. Bells, bells, bells.Yep. Sorry, author. I had to abandon the book. The whines of the main character were too much f [...]


    18. (4.5 stars) Leanne Lieberman is one of my favourite Orca authors. Her characters are fresh and funny and wrestle with interesting issues. In this one, Lauren is sick of always hearing about the persecution of the Jews. Her dad is a holocaust scholar and she has read extensively on the subject. When the boy she likes plays a game that involves wearing swastika arm bands, she must address what it means to really remember the holocaust. There is always a bit of humour in Lieberman’s heroines and [...]


    19. Lauren, doesn't want to be Jewish any more. It's not that she wants to be a different religion--she just wants to be a "non-Jew by choice. Her dad is a Holocaust historian and she has read way too much on the subject, to a point that is causes her anxiety attacks. There are typical high school issues mixed in with religious issue throughout this book. It is told with light banter and funny moments.


    20. This book interested me because of the title. Lauren is tired of the Holocaust as a topic because it's what she's heard about all her life from her Holocaust-historian father. I think the teenage characters were very real, and I liked the story, but I'm not quite sure about the book in general. There seemed to be more of a resolution to her romantic issue than to the issues she had with being Jewish - at least for me. I'm not sure she ever really figured out her feelings about the Holocaust.


    21. A realistic story about a 16 year old Jewish girl who doesn't think she wants to be Jewish anymore. I liked how realistically Lauren is written but I feel like there was a few too many elements in the book, like the Holocaust, and panic attacks, and friends growing apart, and romance, and tolerance, and an autistic little brother (although he is never identified as such.) It's a lot for one book. (Amanda)


    22. Lauren is just a teenage girl with her normal troubles. She has a crush on a guy and so do her friend. what her friend doesn't know is she kissed the boy held hands and is always with him no matter what. when her friend finds out that he is not interested in her she gets upset. When the end comes they still never date but they sound like they would start anytime.


    23. A really thoughtful read not about the Holocaust, per-se, but about one girl's struggle to figure out her Jewish identity, and how it relates to the rest of the world. She has some complicated, but understandable feelings about the Holocaust and being Jewish, and the novel deftly explores these issues. Highly recommended for ages 14+ due to some swearing and underage drinking.


    24. Maybe because the book cover somehow made me think this would be light, or maybe the title mislead me, but I thought this book went nowhere. Sort of a romance, sort of a teen angst, sort of a sibling storyne was particularly convincing, and I felt that the book pretty much just stopped, rather than ended. I doubt that I willbe book talking this one to the kids at school.


    25. Lauren's dad is a Holocaust expert. While other kids got to go to Disneyland, she got to go to concentration camps. She's tired of the whole Jewish thing and decides to give it up – until some kids at school start playing Nazi war games. Then she has some hard decisions to make. Takes a very grave topic and wraps it in humor in a way that is not denigrating at all; authentic teen voices.


    26. Very believable story about a teenage girl who resents being Jewish and having to hear about the Holocaust all of the time. When she catches her friends playing Nazi war games, Lauren struggles over what to do: does the Holocaust matter enough to her to speak out? This story grabs you and doesn't let go. Girls grades 8 and up--especially those who are questioning their religion.


    27. A realistic story about a 16 year old Jewish girl who doesn't think she wants to be Jewish anymore. I liked how realistically Lauren is written but I feel like there was a few too many elements in the book, like the Holocaust, and panic attacks, and friends growing apart, and romance, and tolerance, and an autistic little brother (although he is never identified as such.) It's a lot for one book.


    28. An interesting story of a Vancouver teen, who decides to give up being Jewish, but cannot seem to escape who she is. Themes of tolerance and identity are well developed , as well as friendship. I must admit that I loathe this title, but, in light of the storyline, it works in the end.


    29. The irony was not lost on me that this book, about a girl hating how central the Holocaust is to her life, spends so much time talking about the Holocaust. But it's a thoughtful book and stays away from easy answers, which I appreciate.


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