Fatal Fortnight: Arthur Ponsonby and the Fight for British Neutrality in 1914

Fatal Fortnight: Arthur Ponsonby and the Fight for British Neutrality in 1914

Duncan Marlor / Jan 23, 2020

Fatal Fortnight Arthur Ponsonby and the Fight for British Neutrality in Numerous books have been published about the First World War but few have focused on the machinations in the British parliament and the role it played in the decision to go to war Britain after all

  • Title: Fatal Fortnight: Arthur Ponsonby and the Fight for British Neutrality in 1914
  • Author: Duncan Marlor
  • ISBN: 9781473822863
  • Page: 490
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Numerous books have been published about the First World War but few have focused on the machinations in the British parliament and the role it played in the decision to go to war Britain, after all, could not have entered the conflict without clear approval from MPs One hundred years on, Fatal Fortnight reexamines the arguments which Parliament heard against British warNumerous books have been published about the First World War but few have focused on the machinations in the British parliament and the role it played in the decision to go to war Britain, after all, could not have entered the conflict without clear approval from MPs One hundred years on, Fatal Fortnight reexamines the arguments which Parliament heard against British war entry and reflects on how the world might have been had the decision gone a different way At the center of the stormy debate was the enigmatic Arthur Ponsonby Born into the heart of the aristocracy, the son of Queen Victoria s Private Secretary and pageboy to the Queen, Ponsonby was a champion of social reform and of democratic foreign policy His grandfather fought at Waterloo and his brother was a Brigadier who served on the Western Front he himself loathed war and sought alternatives, and as Chairman of the Liberal Foreign Affairs Committee he led the backbench battle to try to keep Britain out of the 1914 war Alongside the unraveling political drama a human story emerges of how family support for Ponsonby and his allies sustained them as the world closed in.

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      Published :2019-02-20T14:24:05+00:00

    About "Duncan Marlor"

      • Duncan Marlor

        Duncan Marlor Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Fatal Fortnight: Arthur Ponsonby and the Fight for British Neutrality in 1914 book, this is one of the most wanted Duncan Marlor author readers around the world.


    303 Comments

    1. A fascinating day-by-day account of how Parliament went to war in 1914. The personalities are deftly brought to life by judicious use of quotes although I'd like to have read more about 'the other side', especially Lord Grey (he of the lights going out all over Europe).The only thing that was missing was a convincing explanation of how the British people went from being anti-war to cheering in the streets on the 3rd of August.Well worth a read for anyone interested in history, politics or the ma [...]


    2. The story of Parliament during the run-up to the First World War isn't well-known: certainly significantly less has been written about it than about the run-up to the Second. So this book is an interesting addition to the literature.Marlor presents a view "from the bottom", in the sense that he's concerned with the actions of backbench MPs trying to keep Britain neutral. The book is therefore good to compare against The Guns of August which looks at the same events more from the view of the prot [...]


    3. A recounting of the neutrality movement leading up to WWI in England. This group was larger than you might think and many of the governing Liberals were members. But their fight against the pro-war movement was doomed by the treaty agreement with France and Russia about which Parliament was kept in the dark. Newspapers were largely jingoist. The Times the worst of the bunch. Neutralists during the war were hounded, beaten and sometimes jailed. The level of viciousness quite astounding. In 1917 a [...]


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