Magneto, Volume 2: Reversals

Magneto, Volume 2: Reversals

Cullen Bunn Gabriel Hernandez Walta Javier Fernández Roland Boschi Jordie Bellaire Dan Brown Lee Loughridge Cory Petit / Dec 12, 2019

Magneto Volume Reversals An Avengers X Men AXIS tie in Magneto was once arguably the most powerful mutant on the planet But recently his powers have been reduced to a whisper of what they once were How far will he go to beco

  • Title: Magneto, Volume 2: Reversals
  • Author: Cullen Bunn Gabriel Hernandez Walta Javier Fernández Roland Boschi Jordie Bellaire Dan Brown Lee Loughridge Cory Petit
  • ISBN: 9780785189886
  • Page: 245
  • Format: Paperback
  • An Avengers X Men AXIS tie in Magneto was once arguably the most powerful mutant on the planet But recently, his powers have been reduced to a whisper of what they once were How far will he go to become the Master of Magnetism once When Magneto discovers that mutants are being hauled away to a re education camp, he investigatesd discovers that the Red SAn Avengers X Men AXIS tie in Magneto was once arguably the most powerful mutant on the planet But recently, his powers have been reduced to a whisper of what they once were How far will he go to become the Master of Magnetism once When Magneto discovers that mutants are being hauled away to a re education camp, he investigatesd discovers that the Red Skull is behind the operation And worse, the villain possesses the brain and powers of Magneto s deceased friend, Charles Xavier Taking this affront personally on many levels, Magneto vows to take down the Red Skull once and for all but as the Skull sends the world into a spiral of destruction, will Magneto crumple before the maniac Collecting Magneto 7 12

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      245 Cullen Bunn Gabriel Hernandez Walta Javier Fernández Roland Boschi Jordie Bellaire Dan Brown Lee Loughridge Cory Petit
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      Posted by:Cullen Bunn Gabriel Hernandez Walta Javier Fernández Roland Boschi Jordie Bellaire Dan Brown Lee Loughridge Cory Petit
      Published :2019-09-17T19:27:38+00:00

    About "Cullen Bunn Gabriel Hernandez Walta Javier Fernández Roland Boschi Jordie Bellaire Dan Brown Lee Loughridge Cory Petit"

      • Cullen Bunn Gabriel Hernandez Walta Javier Fernández Roland Boschi Jordie Bellaire Dan Brown Lee Loughridge Cory Petit

        Cullen grew up in rural North Carolina, but now lives in the St Louis area with his wife Cindy and his son Jackson His noir horror comic and first collaboration with Brian Hurtt , The Damned, was published in 2007 by Oni Press The follow up, The Damned Prodigal Sons, was released in 2008 In addition to The Sixth Gun, his current projects include Crooked Hills, a middle reader horror prose series from Evileye Books The Tooth, an original graphic novel from Oni Press and various work for Marvel and DC Somewhere along the way, Cullen founded Undaunted Press and edited the critically acclaimed small press horror magazine, Whispers from the Shattered Forum.All writers must pay their dues, and Cullen has worked various odd jobs, including Alien Autopsy Specialist, Rodeo Clown, Professional Wrestler Manager, and Sasquatch Wrangler And, yes, he has fought for his life against mountain lions and he did perform on stage as the World s Youngest Hypnotist Buy him a drink sometime, and he ll tell you all about it.Visit his website at cullenbunn.


    411 Comments

    1. I'm still happy with the work Bunn is doing on Magneto. I feel like he has a great grasp of the character and what makes him tick. Yes, the book is indeed dominated by (sometimes quite violent) action, but there are moments that rise above that. I was especially struck by Magneto's observation, mid-battle, that his Mutant Growth Hormone riddled opponents don't truly understand their powers, because they've never had to live with the danger and persecution that's inherent to being a mutant. In ge [...]


    2. Like in X-Men: First Class, Magneto is a hunter of mutant-haters in his solo series, an anti-heroic protector of mutantkind doing what he feels has to be done with lethal force. In this second volume, his travels takes him to China where a new strain of MGH (Mutant Growth Hormone which, when injected, gives the user temporary mutant powers) is being produced, before the garbage Marvel event Axis sends him to the fallen mutant city of Genosha where the Red Skull is up to some stereotypical bad gu [...]


    3. Art is terrible. Almost enough to ruin things. Polar opposite of Elektra book from earlier today. Good character study of Magneto, again going with four different namesErik Max Magnus etc.Here he keeps taking out people abusing mutants, including some Mutant Growth Hormone growers. Then we run into the AXIS storyline, which I'll have to fill in on Marvel Unlimited I can now catch up on everything.There's a team up with villains (and Deadpool) Magneto leads and that's straight up 1987 awesome. I [...]


    4. Magneto despite his drop in power continues on his crusade to protect mutants from anyone who would harm them. In this search he comes across the Red Skull enslaving mutants in Genosha.Magneto is definitely a tortured character. His measures are extreme, but his enemies are brutal. He doesn't fight just to fight he seeks to protect mutants from people who would enslave or exterminate them. This volume is quite similar to the last until the Axis tie in. Then Magneto is forced to recruit some frie [...]


    5. Axis tie-in! That's the last thing I wanted from this title. Now what was a interesting story is converted into some silliness thats part of a larger story that I have no interest in reading. I'm fed up with being burnt by cross-over events.


    6. As with the first volume, Bunn does a good job of characterizing Magneto and depicting his troubles. And once more he does so while doing a great job of paying homage to X-continuity. The last three issues had the possibility of being troublesome because of their deep connections with the Axis crossover. Fortunately, Bunn is very skillful at bridging the gaps and telling a mostly coherent story. I still want to read Axis to discover what else was going on, but I feel like I got a complete story [...]


    7. Not as much fun as a standalone story as the previous volume. I felt that shoehorning what Bunn is trying to do with the Magneto character into the broader Uncanny Avengers story line created by another writer didn't do the title any favours in terms of coherence or continuity.


    8. A solid continuation of the series while also being a good tie in to Axis. For some reason, I've enjoyed all the tie ins to this event so far. Magneto has always interested me as a character. This has an interesting perspective to dive into his history while tying it to the current storyline (and, oddly enough, even some current events in 2017). On the flip side, some of it does get redundant, like the constant references to the genocide on Genosha. Makes me wish I would go back and read some of [...]


    9. Oh no!! This series continues to be wonderful!So we all know the importance of Erik's past with growing up Jewish during WWII and, as awful as this sounds, I have heard complaints that this backstory is too often used for his characterization. (Effectively one of the most asinine complaints I have ever heard about the X-Men series, both because of the tremendous ignorance it displays as well as the complete tone-blindness required to make such a comment, but I digress) This series brings this to [...]


    10. This was brilliant, till issue 12, which was 1 of those awful melodramatic issues where there's no real story, just individual cartoons with people saying things supposed to be heroic or dramatic, which I'm not a fan of.



    11. I like this Magneto, the last issue wasn't that good, but the rest is nice. It is the Magneto he should always have been


    12. The writing is still the same Cullen Bunn quality as the first volume, and the first half of this does continue nicely along with the plot, but then the road gets bumpier when it gets absorbed into this greater struggle against the pumped up Red Skull, and the battle itself is pretty unsatisfying from panel to panel action, just a giant group of heroes and supervillains chatting while the massive modified Skull and his Sentinels loom in the background. It was nice that Erik faced a little actual [...]


    13. Magneto continúa su cruzada contra las amenazas a los mutantes y se convierte en un antihéroe y líder de los villanos más poderosos para salvar no sólo a los mutantes, sino posiblemente a la tierra. Lo más interesante de la historia es que en este caso, sus acciones nada tienen que ver con un imperativo moral, sino con su sed de venganza y la lealtad a su viejo amigo Charles Xavier.


    14. Magneto's back at it again with the angsty internal monologue. I wasn't a huge fan of this collection. The art was okay, the plot was all over the place, and the dialogue was, at times, cringey. If you're new to the X-Men, definitely don't start with this series.





    15. Here is a story that left me reeling in the wake of Magneto's character development and how he navigates his own journey to save mutantkind from genocide and manipulation. The elements of this story were exciting and had analogs to the real world, from dog fighting to steroid abuse to other worse things, and Magneto is forced to investigate further into the world of mutant abuse to get at the truth of what's happening. In the first volume of this story, Magneto seemed to be on the verge of a big [...]


    16. Bunn's very strong run on Magneto only continues in volume two, though it gets bogged down by the Axis tie in. Magneto is a very complicated and dense character, and Bunn continues to illustrate fantastic mastery of the character - not only his convictions but also the demons that continually haunt him as he puts those contradictions into action. There were some really poignant development moments in this volume, but sometimes his inner monologues become a bit much.I thought Red Skull was a fant [...]


    17. Continuing from the first volume, we see a Magneto whose powers don't work perfectly still trying to accomplish his agenda. We see him raiding a mutant fighting ring connected to an operation producing a very pure Mutant Growth Hormone and dispensing his rather brutal brand of justice to them. The second half of the book features a Magneto with stronger powers (due to some of that MGH in his system) attacking the Red Skull in Genosha and ties in to the Axis event, and Magneto's reversal from tha [...]


    18. okay. This reallllly suffered by not including Uncanny Avengers #25, which is where the actual battle happens and Erik kills Red Skull and creates Onslaught, as if this has never happened before and it is a totally shocking surprise that when he gives into his rage and kills Charles, bad things happen. On the plus (for me) side, Red Skull spent a lot of time psychologically torturing Erik and then shouting CHARLES NEVER LOVED YOU. So meow Red Skull whatever, now the Avengers etc are battling Ons [...]


    19. It's alright. Cullen Bunn is a decent writer ( I have really enjoyed his Sinestro series for DC; It covers a lot of the same ground with a similar character), but he can only do so much with what he is given here. The feeling I get reading it though, is not specific to this book; Its a feeling I've gotten while reading any of the recent Marvel series I've tried. The Marvel universe to me seems to be spinning its wheels, almost in the way DC was in the early 80's. New ideas and story lines are so [...]


    20. I think most of the problems I had with this book were on my end1) it's clearly a tie-in to some shit I don't understand2) I don't give a shit abou Red Skull, what is he doing all up in my X-men stories3) I've read a lot of fanfiction about Magneto and that format is perhaps better able to explore the nuances of Magneto, because he's a super complicated character and here it's just like, yeah, no, I get it, because the Holocaust. I GET IT. I checked out vols 3 and 4 of this but I think I'm prob [...]


    21. I must say I had very little idea what was going on here, reading it as a stand alone book. There seemed plenty of decent ideas floating around here, so I have no doubt Bunn has a good grasp on character and his story, but having to fit it into a larger crossover just meant it was a mess. Characters come and go, plots disappear, we flashback and forward without warning. The muddy art doesn't help anything other than helping me see what Magneto would look like in a Vertigo book, and the bald look [...]


    22. I liked the art a lot but the AXIS tie-in nature of this book really broke it in many places. In between certain issues (which are just chapters here, of course), the reader is supposed to have read, say, Uncanny Avengers 20 and 22 and AXIS 1.75. Marvel could have thrown a very small bone and written that between chapters like a "Please turn this audiocassette over" chime. Without that the result is disorientation.


    23. Well, I had heard this previously arresting series went off the rails once it crashed into the crossover clusterfuck of Axis, but I still wasn't prepared for how thoroughly tiresome it gets. Suddenly, nuanced shades of grey and air-punching scenes of brutal vengeance are replaced with rote speechifying, convenient yet implausible shifts in motivation (even before the big personality-swap McGuffin hits) and a general sense of slog.


    24. An okay read but really missing in that spark that would make it more. And Magneto is a tired subject. You can get rid of most of his powers but you can't as easily making him someone worth reading about. An a travelogue plot - we go here, we go there - yeah whatever. And a poor use of the supporting cast.


    25. This series continues to delve into darkness of Magneto's mind and showing how his villainy can create a hero the world needs. In true form, this book also shows how tie-ins to major comic book events can truly shine. And I certainly feel this is the kind of the direction the Main Axis event should have gone.


    26. I love what Bunn established in volume 1, and now this volume 2 we have other characters brought in, and the pacing and tension lose focus and suffer (seemingly) as a result.Oh, and the art loses consistency too.Hopefully this is just a transition book, and the next volume will hold a real magnetic charge.


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