Native American Fiction: A User's Manual

Native American Fiction: A User's Manual

David Treuer / Dec 09, 2019

Native American Fiction A User s Manual An entirely new approach to reading understanding and enjoying Native American fictionThis book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about

  • Title: Native American Fiction: A User's Manual
  • Author: David Treuer
  • ISBN: 9781555974527
  • Page: 181
  • Format: Paperback
  • An entirely new approach to reading, understanding, and enjoying Native American fictionThis book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about at all, it is worth thinking about as literature The vast majority of thought that has been poured out onto Native American literature has puddled, for the most part, on howAn entirely new approach to reading, understanding, and enjoying Native American fictionThis book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about at all, it is worth thinking about as literature The vast majority of thought that has been poured out onto Native American literature has puddled, for the most part, on how the texts are positioned in relation to history or culture.Rather than create a comprehensive cultural and historical genealogy for Native American literature, David Treuer investigates a selection of the most important Native American novels and, with a novelist s eye and a critic s mind, examines the intricate process of understanding literature on its own terms.Native American Fiction A User s Manual is speculative, witty, engaging, and written for the inquisitive reader These essays on Sherman Alexie, Forrest Carter, James Feni Cooper, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch are rallying cries for the need to read literature as literature and, ultimately, reassert the importance and primacy of the word.

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      Published :2019-09-15T02:58:26+00:00

    About "David Treuer"

      • David Treuer

        David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, and fellowships from the NEH, Bush Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation He divides his time between his home on the Leech Lake Reservation and Minneapolis He is the author of three novels and a book of criticism His essays and stories have appeared in Esquire, TriQuarterly, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Lucky Peach, the LA Times, and Slate.Treuer published his first novel, Little, in 1995 He received his PhD in anthropology and published his second novel, The Hiawatha, in 1999 His third novel The Translation of Dr Apelles and a book of criticism, Native American Fiction A User s Manual appeared in 2006 The Translation of Dr Apelles was named a Best Book of the Year by The Washington Post, Time Out, and City Pages REZ LIFE is his newest book and is now out in paperback with Grove Press.


    334 Comments

    1. Reassesses Native American fiction through its uses of Western literary techniques rather than as emblem of Native American culture(s). Extremely good at close readings of texts, some truth to the position of NA fiction as artifact, weakened by arguments pushed farther than texts (usually reviews & interviews, not books) warrant (suspect Bloom-worthy misprisions) and also by failure to define key terms in argument, such as "culture" and "literature" (as opposed to "Native American," which is [...]


    2. Throughout this book Treuer asserts that his goal for this book is to break down the stereotypical assumptions of what "native american" literature "is" or "is not". I would love to read that book when it is written, but this is not that book.Most of Treuer's critiques are nothing more thinly veiled personal attacks aimed at "exposing" other "native american" authors' lack of "authentic" "native american" knowledge. He repeatedly brandishes his alleged knowledge of the Ojibwe language and their [...]


    3. I've just re-re-read nearly all David Treur's Native American Fiction, in which the author, an Ojibwe of the Leech Lake MN rezwho writes novels and teaches in Minneapolis, asserts that there is no such thing as "Native American Fiction," that it in itself is a fiction which needs to be read as literature and not as "Native American." Treur's thesis is not a willfully paradoxical one, but based in the Indian's historical dilemna in trying to communicate with non-Indians. That is, the Indian, whil [...]


    4. I feel guilty marking this as "read," because I just couldn't bring myself to finish it. Treuer makes some very valid points as to why "Native American fiction" as a concept doesn't exist - or at least, that was my take-away having gotten through half of the book. I should have known this book wasn't for me - I don't tend to care for critics and here's a man critiquing other critics. It also didn't help that I've only read one of the books he talks about, but my real issue was his tone.I get how [...]


    5. This books made some very interesting points. However, it often bogged down into such mind numbing detail about what seemed trivial facts, that I found it a very difficult read. I ended up skimming through much of it.


    6. really enjoyed this but want to come back to it after i've read Silko's Ceremony and Welch's Fool's Crow.



    7. I'm still contending with this book. I'll have something definitive to say by the end of the fall semester.



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