You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a "Useless" Liberal Arts Education

You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a "Useless" Liberal Arts Education

George Anders / May 27, 2020

You Can Do Anything The Surprising Power of a Useless Liberal Arts Education In a tech dominated world the most needed degrees are the most surprising the liberal arts Did you take the right classes in college Will your major help you get the right job offers For than a decad

  • Title: You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a "Useless" Liberal Arts Education
  • Author: George Anders
  • ISBN: 9780316548809
  • Page: 395
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In a tech dominated world, the most needed degrees are the most surprising the liberal arts Did you take the right classes in college Will your major help you get the right job offers For than a decade, the national spotlight has focused on science and engineering as the only reliable choice for finding a successful post grad career Our destinies have been reducedIn a tech dominated world, the most needed degrees are the most surprising the liberal arts Did you take the right classes in college Will your major help you get the right job offers For than a decade, the national spotlight has focused on science and engineering as the only reliable choice for finding a successful post grad career Our destinies have been reduced to a caricature learn to write computer code or end up behind a counter, pouring coffee Quietly, though, a different path to success has been taking shape In YOU CAN DO ANYTHING, George Anders explains the remarkable power of a liberal arts education and the ways it can open the door to thousands of cutting edge jobs every week.The key insight curiosity, creativity, and empathy aren t unruly traits that must be reined in You can be yourself, as an English major, and thrive in sales You can segue from anthropology into the booming new field of user research from classics into management consulting, and from philosophy into high stakes investing At any stage of your career, you can bring a humanist s grace to our rapidly evolving high tech future And if you know how to attack the job market, your opportunities will be vast.In this book, you will learn why resume writing is fading in importance and why telling your story is taking its place You will learn how to create jobs that don t exist yet, and to translate your campus achievements into a new style of expression that will make employers eyes light up You will discover why people who start in eccentric first jobs and then make their own luck so often race ahead of peers whose post college hunt focuses only on security and starting pay You will be ready for anything.

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      Published :2020-02-09T22:07:59+00:00

    About "George Anders"

      • George Anders

        George Anders Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a "Useless" Liberal Arts Education book, this is one of the most wanted George Anders author readers around the world.


    762 Comments

    1. We seem to live in a world of STEM Über Alles, where if a young person doesn’t learn to code, he or she is condemned to life as a barista or a dog walker. But are engineers destined to rule the world? Perhaps not, just as it isn’t the ultra-logical Mr. Spock who commands the Starship Enterprise, but rather the charismatic Captain Kirk.In his new book, author George Anders has done a brilliant job of decrypting today’s job market, identifying vast new opportunities for young people with li [...]


    2. This book by a well known business writer, I think for Forbes magazine, is the latest in a series of efforts to establish the value of a liberal arts education. It is fairly effective if a bit overconstructed. These arguments have been around for a long time along with the little recognized point that a large number of college degrees have been "non liberal arts" for a while, including degrees in engineering, business, nursing, and education. Anders is already singing to the choir with me and it [...]


    3. A very interesting answer to al those with liberal educations.Withnso many specialized degrees students worry about nthevvalue of this degree.Read this book you will be surprised at the answers,


    4. George Anders undertakes a difficult task in You Can Do Anything: he offers hope and advice to liberal arts majors. (Whether it works on their parents is another matter.) As college tuition has taken off, parents and students have become increasingly concerned about the return on investment. Thousands of students head to campuses each fall having heard some version of The Talk: major in something tech-related so you can have a job after school. Parents wring their hands about their sophomore phi [...]



    5. Anders provides a comprehensive and, for the most part, practical guide for liberal arts students in the search for a job. The organization pattern is wisely divided into Your Strengths, Your Opportunities, Your Allies, and, finally, You’re Tool Kit. The tool kit chapters could stand alone as a technical strategy for translating a liberal arts degree into a job. He challenges the reader to have a story that shows how he/she ticks. He reminds us that employers want to know how we have overcome [...]


    6. A lovely collection of Liberal Arts best case scenario stories. Much name dropping (individuals and colleges). Some also great ideas about networking, calling on alumni, and making the most of all opportunities in order to get the life you want. Fair about the earning potential for a liberal arts major as well.


    7. Worth reading for current college students, liberal arts graduates, and those of us who mentor these two groups. I've done close to 500 technical interviews over the last several years and I have definitely seen the value of the combination of technology knowledge with the critical thinking skills that develops from a liberal arts education.


    8. These kinds of books always go the same way. They start off great, explaining endlessly all the things you can do with a liberal Arts degree. And yeah, Anders does a better job than most with that. Especially so because he backs it up with the number of unemployed CS majors and the fact that by the time you're 40-50 you've caught up and surpassed the business majors (but never the engineers). The problem is that effectively all the anecdotes he displays in the book are all about people who are e [...]


    9. Wonderful reassurance to all those with seemingly "pointless" liberal arts majors who don't know what to do with themselves necessarily ! Huge thank you to Sonya who gave me the book and has helped me soothe all my anxieties about the looming future.


    10. Don’t be fooled by the title, this book is a must-read for any college student, parents of college students, employers, college advisors, graduates, and most specifically, the liberal arts student. George Anders’ book packs a plethora of supporting evidence and facts to boost his stance that majoring in a liberal arts education doesn’t mean that you are forever chained to a life of saying, “Would you like fries with that?” College is a time-consuming endeavor with a large price tag, pa [...]


    11. 3.5 starsI think what might be most helpful about this book for liberal arts majors worried about their ability to make a living is the research that shows that while liberal arts graduates might make less right out of college they tend to catch up in income over time, earning more than other more "technical" degrees. I think it's also helpful to have all the various people mentioned in the book who are doing things that at first glance don't seem at all connected to whatever they studied in col [...]


    12. Probably about 3.5 stars. I enjoyed this book, and man, did it start out like gangbusters. I was so fired up after the first 50 pages that I came in to work more inspired than I had been in quite some time. It had me thinking about all the ways I've replaced thinking with doing and routine and the realization that I missed the process of thinking! Needless to say, I've had one of the better weeks of work I've had in a long time - and I'm inspired to continue that momentum.That being said, the re [...]


    13. upbeat description of good career prospects for those who majored in something other than business, engineering, computer science etc. Acknowledges on the basis of big-picture surveys that liberal arts types make less money on average shortly after graduation [and sometimes beyond -- my major trails the pack 0-5 years out and 10-20 years out per his tables on pp. 153-154], but anecdote after anecdote shows it's not impossible to carve out your own path and make a living.The book rides a wave of [...]


    14. I didn't actually finish this book. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't great, either. I had it as an ebook from my library, and it wasn't worth renewing when it expired.I do think the concept is an important one, and the author does a good job of explaining all the ways a liberal arts degree can be useful in out-of-the-box jobs. I just felt like it started getting really repetitive in the middle, and all the example stories started running together--especially when he would refer back to one from a fe [...]


    15. Interesting. Definitely makes me see liberal arts with more merit. My only issue with the book is that its numerous anecdotes, at some point, started to damage the book's main thesis. Yes, I do see that a liberal arts education can prepare you for the future. Does it matter if I know that there's companies that hire specifically for liberal arts degrees? And that this one person was a liberal arts major but now works at a tech company? This book was more of a self help book for liberal arts grad [...]


    16. As a graduate of a small liberal arts college long ago, this was a delightful read and brought back memories of my college experience. As a father of the three children who have all attended small liberal arts colleges, I was glad to have their decisions validated through the stories and statistics provided by the author. The only thing that prevents me from rating this book higher is that the BEST audience for this book would be a high school student thinking about where to go to college and wh [...]


    17. Repetitive but goodI recommend this read for the author's comments on a blurry subject. Not many people in my past reading have been able to articulate on the value of a liberal arts education in the workplace and give concrete but honest examples of what potential this line of thinking brings to an employer and business.


    18. It's about 10 percent tactical. The majority is inspirational stories that will help you think outside the box if you so happened to be a liberal arts major. It makes good sound arguments of why you are better positioned in society and does provide statistical facts. The hardest part is to take that leap of faith. You have to know it and believe it. Otherwise, it's just another book.


    19. I don't know that I really bought into the idea that a liberal arts degree does that much for you, but it was interesting to see that unconventional career paths can lead to exciting opportunities. Could these career paths be open to people without any degree or and sort of degree? Maybe.


    20. I won this in a giveaway. This book provides some insights into possible where-to-go-from-heres with your Liberal Arts degree That about sums it up.


    21. maybe its because I'm more desperate to capitalize my skills but this was very broad and then very specific. hone in on saying yes- tech design.i prefer the defining decade


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