The Long Descent: A User's Guide to the End of the Industrial Age

The Long Descent: A User's Guide to the End of the Industrial Age

John Michael Greer / Nov 12, 2019

The Long Descent A User s Guide to the End of the Industrial Age SeattleOil The Internet writings of John Michael Greer beyond any doubt the greatest peak oil historian in the English language have finally made their way into print Greer fans will recognize many of

  • Title: The Long Descent: A User's Guide to the End of the Industrial Age
  • Author: John Michael Greer
  • ISBN: 9780865716094
  • Page: 395
  • Format: Paperback
  • SeattleOil The Internet writings of John Michael Greer beyond any doubt the greatest peak oil historian in the English language have finally made their way into print Greer fans will recognize many of the book s passages from previous essays, but will be delighted to see them fleshed out here with additional examples and analysis.The Long Descent is one of the mSeattleOil The Internet writings of John Michael Greer beyond any doubt the greatest peak oil historian in the English language have finally made their way into print Greer fans will recognize many of the book s passages from previous essays, but will be delighted to see them fleshed out here with additional examples and analysis.The Long Descent is one of the most highly anticipated peak oil books of the year, and it lives up to every ounce of hype Greer is a captivating, brilliantly inventive writer with a deep knowledge of history, an impressive amount of mechanical savvy, a flair for storytelling and a gift for drawing art analogies His new book presents an astonishing view of our society s past, present and future trajectory one that is unmatched in its breadth and depth Reviewed by Frank KaminskiWired The Long Descent is a welcome antidote to the armageddonism that often accompanies peak oil discussions The decline of a civilization is rarely anything like so sudden for those who live through it writes Greer, encouragingly it s a much slower and complex transformation than the sudden catastrophes imagined by many soical critics today The changes that will follow the decline of world petroleum production are likely to be sweeping and global, Greer concludes, but from the perspective of those who live through them these changes are much likely to take gradual and local forms Reviewed by Bruce SterlingAmericans are expressing deep concern about US dependence on petroleum, rising energy prices, and the threat of climate change Unlike the energy crisis of the 1970s, however, there is a lurking fear that now the times are different and the crisis may not easily be resolved.The Long Descent examines the basis of such fear through three core themes Industrial society is following the same well worn path that has led other civilizations into decline, a path involving a much slower and complex transformation than the sudden catastrophes imagined by so many social critics today The roots of the crisis lie in the cultural stories that shape the way we understand the world Since problems cannot be solved with the same thinking that created them, these ways of thinking need to be replaced with others better suited to the needs of our time It is too late for massive programs for top down change the change must come from individuals.Hope exists in actions that range from taking up a handicraft or adopting an obsolete technology, through planting an organic vegetable garden, taking charge of your own health care or spirituality, and building community.Focusing eloquently on constructive adaptation to massive change, this book will have wide appeal.John Michael Greer is a certified Master Conserver, organic gardener, and scholar of ecological history The current Grand Archdruid of the Ancient Order of Druids in America AODA , his widely cited blog, The Archdruid Report thearchdruidreport deals with peak oil, among other issues He lives in Ashland, Oregon.

    The Long Descent A User s Guide to the End of The Long Descent is one of the most highly anticipated peak oil booanalysis The SeattleOil The Internet writings of John Michael Greer beyond any doubt the greatest peak oil historian in the English language have finally made their way into print. The Long Descent A User s Guide to the End of the The Long Descent is one of the most highly anticipated peak oil books of the year, and it lives up to every ounce of hype Greer is a captivating, brilliantly inventive writer with a deep knowledge of history, an impressive amount of mechanical savvy, a flair for storytelling and a gift for drawing art analogies His new book presents an astonishing view of our society s past, present and future trajectory one that is John Michael Greer The Long Descent YouTube First published May , John Michael Greer on peak oil and the end of the industrial age In his compelling book The Long Descent, John presents a chal The Long Descent A User s Guide to the End of the Zum Hauptinhalt wechseln Prime entdecken DE Hallo Anmelden Konto und Listen Anmelden Konto und Listen Bestellungen Entdecken Sie Prime Einkaufs wagen The Long Descent von Logical Terror bei Music Entdecken Sie The Long Descent von Logical Terror bei Music Werbefrei streamen oder als CD und MP kaufen bei . The Long Descent Syphon Filter Wiki FANDOM The Descent novel The Descent is a science fiction horror novel by American author Jeff Long It describes the discovery and exploration of an extensive labyrinth of tunnels and passages stretching throughout the Earth s upper mantle, found to be inhabited by a malicious species The Long Descent YouTube Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS The Long Descent Logical Terror Darkest Halloween Compilation DarkTunes Music Group Released on Music The Long Descent YouTube Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS The Long Descent Logical Terror Ashes of Fate DarkTunes Music Group Released on Author Eddy Cavazza Autho The Long Descent A User s Guide to the End of The Long Descent A User s Guide to the End of the Industrial Age John Michael Greer on FREE shipping on qualifying offers A harrowing but ultimately hopeful vision of the aftermath of the age of oil Americans are expressing deep concern about US dependence on petroleum

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    About "John Michael Greer"

      • John Michael Greer

        John Michael Greer is an author of over thirty books and the blogger behind The Archdruid Report He also serves as Grand Archdruid of the Ancient Order of Druids in America His work addresses a range of subjects, including climate change, peak oil and the future of industrial society He lives in Rhode Island with his wife.


    172 Comments

    1. Good, if somewhat repetitive, until the last two chapters. Thesis: Fossil fuels will be gone one day, and industrial civilization will collapse, not in the way Hollywood (or many a book you can find on ) suggests, in an apocalyptic fall to tooth-and-nail fighting and cannibalism, but how all other major civilizations have fallen, in a slow stair-step manner, with minor recoveries slowing the fall as populations decline. Nor will technology save us. Solar panels take as much energy to manufacture [...]


    2. First book I've read by a druid and a very interesting book it is. Greer is an out-of-the-box thinker: faced with a choice between two alternatives, he automatically looks for a third. And into the critical debate over how industrial civilization will respond to ecological overshoot (peak oil, peak soil, resource shortages, overpopulation, and so on), which is dominated by a vigorously contested struggle between Cornucopians, who think that science and technology will find a way for economic gro [...]


    3. Lots of good stuff in this book, but it took me a long time to finish, given that Greer's non-fiction writing style tends to put me to sleep after a couple paragraphs. As a regular reader of his blog, The Archdruid Report, I'd seen most of this information before, but there were lots of new things I'd never seen him discuss in the blog, things that, had he brought them up there, might have prevented several disagreements he's had with readers in the comments section of his blog.At the end of the [...]


    4. Little of this, I suspect, will be new to anyone familiar with the brief explosion of literature on peak oil and transition movements since the 1970s, but this is nevertheless an excellent updated introduction to the genre, as well as the reality we are already facing in various forms. It has some warts (both factual and conceptual), but these are minor blemishes on what is generally a well balanced and thoughtful exploration of imminent de-industrialisation in the face of depleting resources, c [...]


    5. The central thesis in Greer’s book is the inevitable end of fossil fuels and the resulting decline of our current oil based economy. Instead of the ‘Age of Progress’ we will (and have been) entering ‘The Long Descent’. He makes the interesting observation that we face a ‘predicament’ rather than a ‘problem to be solved’. “a problem calls for a solution: the only question is whether a solution can be found and made to work and, once this is done, the problem is solved. A predi [...]


    6. I think John Michael Greer is one of our more perceptive thinkers. He is a deep critic of the conventional order. But what I like most about his work is that he keeps his balance between being a rosy-eyed optimist who thinks renewable energy and localization will be nirvana, and a pessimist who sees no hope in the future - he somehow seems to steer a middle course that may not be ideal, but should be livable if we can act soon enough and with enough wisdom. This book is a good example of his wri [...]


    7. Don't let the fact that Greer is an archdruid keep you from being blown out of the water by his cogent analysis of where we are and where we might be headed as peak oil, ecocide, and global climate disruption cause massive civilizational disturbances over the next few years and decades. To the point on a every level: a must read for every breathing adult.


    8. 'The Long Descent' makes a very valuable point that deserves wider consideration: that presently there are two main narratives of the future, endless economic growth and material accumulation vs apocalyptic collapse, chaos, and die-off. Both are mythic stories of a sort, linked to and influenced by religious traditions. Neither forms a realistic or helpful assessment of what is actually likely to happen in years to come. Greer systematically critiques these unrealistically optimistic and pessimi [...]


    9. An enjoyable, thoughtful, and ultimately hopeful look at the downside of M. King Hubbert's peak oil curve. I highly recommend this book to anyone who thinks that, in the words of peak oil pundit Richard Heinberg, the party's over. I also highly recommend it to those who are still in doubt; Greer makes a compelling case that our belief in technoscience as savior is just that, a belief, and that as atheists have noted for the last century or more, simply believing something does not necessarily ma [...]


    10. Before reading his book, I have read many of John Michael Greer's posts on his blog. Like the blog - the Archdruid Report - the book provides many insights about the contemporary world. Unfortunately, the book for its many virtues has a number of flaws as well. Although the work deserves to be read by those interested in how our culture operates, its predictions seem increasingly misplaced.Greer's major economic fallacy is his belief in a variant theory of labor valuation. Many economic thinkers [...]


    11. The central thesis of this book is valid and well argued; we’re running out of oil and need to tackle this with urgency so that we can go through a managed decline of industrial society. Civilisations fail but they rarely collapse overnight, so we can expect a ‘long descent’ rather than an implosion of apocalyptic proportions. But the author does ramble. Anecdotal repetition eventually led to cliché which undermined the flow of the argument.Nor am I entirely convinced, as Greer argues, th [...]


    12. A thoughtful, plausible theory of the trajectory of civilization as we know it. I would have preferred better documentation of his position, as much of it seems to be based on intuition, and comes across as a blind guess. Whether or not this is the case, the book was thought-provoking and well worth my time.


    13. In this book Greer lays out his prediction for the future of declining oil production which, because oil has by far the highest energy returned on energy invested (ERoEI) ratio of all energy resources, will lead to a slow descent of civilization to less complex societies with widespread deindustrialization. To face this he proposes people start to pick up old crafts to be somewhat more prepared for the future to come. I started with this book because I was interested in a deep and subtle discuss [...]


    14. It was startling to read the author’s prognostications that so much paralleled my own but were more optimistic in other ways. As a hook, he compares our society to that of the Mayan, which didn’t disappear overnight but over a century and a half due to overconsumption of a nonrenewable resource base (corn for them.) Sound familiar? The Mayan knew of alternative crops but did not pursue them and instead went to war to seize the corn of others. Apparently, on average it takes about 250 years f [...]


    15. A Head's up to the Future.Everything spot on EXCEPT we keep finding more fossil fuel. And ways to extract it. The descent will be hardest on the youngest Americans. Hope I'll be around to see their faces when the smart phones stop working. The more intelligent will stock up on knowledge, skills, and tools. Networking with the like minded will also help.Hope anyone reading this makes it to the other side of the descent in one piece.



    16. I recently read two of Mr. Greer's books, The Long Descent and The Ecotechnic Future: Envisioning a Post-Peak World. This review is for both of them, as they made me feel and think more or less the same things. For your information, both share the same ideological and theoretical ideas, but they were different in some aspects: The Long Descent's explanation of what the myth of progress is how and why it came about I enjoyed more, while it was the practical information, tips, guidelines, the roug [...]


    17. This is one of the most carefully thought-through analyses of our civilization's future that I've come across, although I believe Greer may be underestimating some of the problems that are coming. His starting point is the fact that at the level of the U.S. and probably of the world, we have passed the point of peak oil extraction, meaning we will be able to get less out of the ground every year in the coming decades. Natural gas and uranium aren't far behind oil in that respect, and coal isn't [...]


    18. John Michael Greer presents an interesting account of one possible future of what can happen as what he dubs "the industrial age" comes to a close. He uses very good arguments up front to show that the availability of energy is declining and describe how we are heading to a change in our lifestyle. He then proceeds to dismiss the two prevailing theories of societal transformation--the doomsday theory and the myth of progress. In doing so, he posits an alternative that he describes as the middle [...]


    19. This book presents the view that deindustrialization of the world is now inevitable. We have reached peak oil right around now and no longer have the resources to build a world that will allow us to maintain anywhere close to our current level of lifestyle and energy consumption. He presents his case that over the next 100-200 years our society will go back to living like we did at the turn of the century. Greer says that it is the myth of progress, the new religion, which is leading us down thi [...]


    20. Each previous civilization has had its beginning, rise and fall. This engaging and clearly written book makes a powerful argument that (American Exceptionalism not withstanding) ours will be no exception.The discovery of how to use inexpensive fossil fuels as portable and extremely concentrated energy sources made possible the extraordinary progress in technology and corresponding global population of the last couple of centuries. When, in the early 1970's, Americans reached a point were they co [...]


    21. I take a near-future Peak Oil scenario as a serious possibility. This book makes an excellent analogy that likens our multi-generational ride on the wave of cheap oil as the winning of a lottery. And like lottery winnings, this windfall is finite and we're fast approaching the end of our sky's-the-limit extravagant lifestyles and just like the sad tales we've heard of real life lottery winners, we've burned through all the resources without creating a sustainable standard of living. It's as if t [...]


    22. If you've been keeping up with the Archdruid's blog, this material will be very familiar. Even for dedicated readers, I can recommend this book as the blog covers so many threads (especially in the comments discussion) that the individual books present the material in a focused, footnoted, and refined way that the blog is not able to do.This book covers the deindustrialisation of American (and by extension most first world countries') society and introduces a calm, nuanced and comprehensive set [...]


    23. The author makes a sensible case for the slow slide of our modern industrial society into decline due to the decline of fossil fuel availability. This is somehow refreshing, if the imminent regression of mankind can be described as such, by comparison to the usual apocalyptic dystopian future scenarios out there. Instead of overnight collapse and mass looting envisioned by so many, Greer compares our current trajectory to previous declines like the Roman and Mayan civilizations, which took a cou [...]


    24. There are two main strengths in this book:1. The central arguments are explained concisely. The main argument that depletion of fossil fuel energy will force considerable adaptation in the developed world is difficult to argue.2. The book covers considerable breadth of related topics, from strategies of adaptation to spirituality related to adaptation. While the organization of the book was good, Greer loses some credibility through his sometimes poor use of examples and his tendency to gloss ov [...]


    25. I value Greer's honesty. I know I've never met John Michael Greer but after reading his book, I consider him my friend. His tone, his message, his wisdom made my reading experience more than enjoyable; I felt like I was having a long conversation with him. The honesty comes from embracing the reality of the passing of peak oil. Two forces will be changing our coming days, sending us into a slow descent or a re-calibration: Climate disruptions will force us into making decisions based on survival [...]


    26. Although the book is nicely written and easy to read, there is a large number of factual discrepancies.From the very beginning, I was grossly disappointed how M.K.Hubbert's fundamental work has been mis-represented by the mathematically-incorrect and physically-impossible statements in J.M.Greer's book. I strongly doubt that the author has read and understood the original publication.Just for the benefit of the readers, it is "Nuclear Energy and the Fossil Fuels," M. King Hubbert, Publication No [...]


    27. John Greer makes a convincing argument that since we have reached and passed Peak Oil, that over the next century the Industrial Age, which has depended on cheap oil, will come to an end as we know it, and be replaced by. . . . ? Well, that depends on what we do in the next 20 to 30 years. Do we sharply reduced our energy usage, do we adjust our lifestyles so we rely less on oil? One of his biggest arguments is that technology will not save us. What made oil so valuable was the high ratio of exp [...]


    28. People assume that "life after peak oil" will fall into either of two scenarios: technology will eventually prevail, or armaggedon is imminent. Neither is likely. Greer explains eloquently why people embrace these two extremes. Using a world view of economics, sociology and psychology, he calmly lays out the more probable scenarios. To say that history repeats itself would miss the point. It's more a matter of life goes on, but never stays the same; and nothing ever continues in the same directi [...]


    29. An entertaining read about how civilization collapses. As dystopian fiction it’s awesome. Maybe like “How to survive a zombie apocalypse” or “world war z”. Take an absurd premise and then think through the implications and then ask how do you survive.The book assumes “peak oil”, assumes “photovoltaic-cells” don’t and won’t work, ignores global warming, etc. As dystopian fiction, as speculative fiction, I loved it. The author, Mr. Greer, unfortunately thinks he’s predictin [...]


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