Less Than Words Can Say (Common Reader Editions)

Less Than Words Can Say (Common Reader Editions)

Richard Mitchell / Feb 19, 2020

Less Than Words Can Say Common Reader Editions Twenty odd years ago Richard Mitchell a professor at New Jersey s Glassboro State College set out on a quixotic pursuit the rescue of the English language and the minds of those attached to the wor

  • Title: Less Than Words Can Say (Common Reader Editions)
  • Author: Richard Mitchell
  • ISBN: 9781888173673
  • Page: 496
  • Format: Paperback
  • Twenty odd years ago, Richard Mitchell, a professor at New Jersey s Glassboro State College, set out on a quixotic pursuit the rescue of the English language and the minds of those attached to the world by it Donning cape and mask as The Underground Grammarian, Mitchell sallied forth upon his newsletter against the nonsense being spoken, written, and, indeed, encouragedTwenty odd years ago, Richard Mitchell, a professor at New Jersey s Glassboro State College, set out on a quixotic pursuit the rescue of the English language and the minds of those attached to the world by it Donning cape and mask as The Underground Grammarian, Mitchell sallied forth upon his newsletter against the nonsense being spoken, written, and, indeed, encouraged by the educational establishment One thing led to another, as he tells it, a front page piece in The Wall Street Journal, a profile in Time, and other such Before it was over, The Underground Grammarian came to be, in the world of desktop printing, the first publication to have subscribers on every continent except Antarctica What began as a vivid catalog of ignorance and inanity in the written work of professional educators and their hapless students soon became an enterprise of most noble moment an investigation, via mordant wit and fierce intelligence, of what we might usefully decide to mean by education The results of Mitchell s inquiries are as stimulating today as they were when first articulated His project remains a telling explication of how, through writing, we discover thought and make knowledge It is certainly the most drolly entertaining.

    • ✓ Less Than Words Can Say (Common Reader Editions) || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Richard Mitchell
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      Posted by:Richard Mitchell
      Published :2019-08-14T00:14:01+00:00

    About "Richard Mitchell"

      • Richard Mitchell

        Richard Mitchell was born in Brooklyn and grew up in Scarsdale, New York He received his higher education, for a brief time, at the University of Chicago, where he met his wife, Francis then at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Syracuse University, where he earned his PhD in American Literature.Dr Mitchell came to Glassboro State College in 1963 and retired in 1991, but continued to teach part time until Fall 2001.In addition to his reputation as a masterful lecturer, and extraordinary teacher, Dr Mitchell was a prolific and well known author He first gained prominence as the writer, publisher, and printer of The Underground Grammarian, a newsletter that offered lively, witty, satiric, and often derisive essays on the misuse of the English language, particularly the misuse of written English on college campuses Many of the essays have been collected and are still in print Dr Mitchell went on to publish four books Less Than Words Can Say, The Graves of Academe, The Leaning Tower of Babel, and The Gift of Fire.One member of the Glassboro College now Rowan University Physics Dept said, He has done to advance the reputation of Glassboro State College than anything since the Lyndon Johnson Aleksei Kosygin Summit Conference of June 1967.


    210 Comments

    1. This book is more organized and focused than "Graves Of Academe," the other Richard Mitchell book that I've read. Mr. Mitchell's argument is centered around the idea that clear use of language engenders clear thinking. Furthermore, without the ability to manipulate language well, it is impossible to really think.During my four years in college, my roommate and I often engaged in debate about whether it was possible to think without words. It was my position, back then, that thought precedes lang [...]


    2. Richard Mitchell has some really good ideas, though his major thesis that language controls thought is incorrect. If language controlled thought, then we could not create language. I also disagree that "the only way we can judge the work of a mind is through its words". I grew up with a lot of people who were bright, disciplined thinkers, but were people who worked with their hands. As such, if you judged their ability to think by their writing, you would have misjudged them. I also know (and ha [...]


    3. Just a few quotes will show how witty and caustic Mitchell can be: "His jargon conceals, from him, but not from us, the deep, empty hole in his mind.""The next thing you know they'll start listening to very carefully to the words and sentences of the politicians, and they'll decide that there isn't one of them worth voting for anywhere on the ballot. There's no knowing where this will end. The day will come when a President is elected only because those few feeble-minded citizens who still vote [...]


    4. I don't read a whole lot of nonfiction, and when I do, I browse or skim. Not so with this book. I read every word. I took notes. That's unheard of in my reading experience. This book is about language and learning. It explains how use of language reflects thinking and lack thereof, and it explores how language is in fact integral to shaping thought. It's also, unexpectedly, a lot of fun. I snickered through whole sections, even when I was sometimes also cringing at the implications. Richard Mitc [...]



    5. This turned out to be a surprisingly powerful book. Published back in 1979, Mr. Mitchell here explains how the manner in which we use language reveals our philosophy and assumptions about words and reality.In a sense, this book is perhaps even a refutation of "nominalism," based upon the epistemology that one must presuppose in order to properly use English grammar.Here are a few excerpts illustrating the sort of thing that Mitchell does to garbled modern writing (see pages 197-201) -___________ [...]



    6. A very fun and important read. He starts on poor use of language, then Mitchell gets onto "identification" (my term); then you see him almost discover that he should have been writing about in the first place, how our educational system is destroying the ability to think. (See The Graves of Academe for that.)You have to read him carefully; he expects that you are intelligent and in focus. That makes it a pleasure to read. He doesn't say, "remember the story I told in the last chapter?", but inst [...]


    7. Through college and in the business world we are taught a thousand ways to write. Most of our lessons deal with the style of the reader/professor/boss. Unfortunately, these people have adapted to the same writing fallacies that plague the rest of the nation. This book addresses these common problems. The author explains the problem, gives us real life examples, and shows you how to avoid the problem in your writing. The finished product is an entertaining book that actually teaches the reader so [...]


    8. I have *just* started this book, and may I say that the first essay, "The Worm in the Brain" is priceless? If you have every dealt with ineffective administrators, you *must* read this essay, and it is available at this website sourcetext/grammarian/


    9. Read intermittently on crowded MTR trains. It might not be as cohesive as The Gift of Fire, but it’s still a worthwhile entreaty against administrators and other tyrants who can’t write well. Recommended reading for arming yourself against the utterly useless institution-speak you are just as likely to encounter today as you were when this book was published 35 years ago.


    10. This is an Ambleside Online 12th grade English recommendation in which Mitchell rants about the public education system while explaining that fluent English results in being logical and that true education wipes out stupidity and ignorance.


    11. An interesting book that links the ability to reason and think clearly to writing well. I enjoyed the book even though Mr. Mitchell is very hard on public education. I must admit much of his complaints were justified.


    12. Those who cannot write well cannot think well. It's a simple premise, but it has changed the way I look at things quite a bit. Mitchell tears in pretty hard to our public education system but, frankly, rightly so. Above all, he's a good writer.


    13. This book may be 30 years old, but people's use of written language hasn't gotten any better than the examples given in it. Mitchell's commentary is often amusing, but he really doesn't offer any ideas for improving people's skills.





    14. Re-read this one. An absolutely hilarious insider take on the American educational system, albeit a little out-dated.


    15. The author was my family's next-door neighbor while I was in the Navy. My sisters baby-sat his kids. I still have the feather and the marble Amanda gave me.


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