Many Moons

Many Moons

James Thurber Marc Simont / Oct 20, 2019

Many Moons A wise tale of a little princess who wanted the moon and got it Grown ups themselves will find the book hilariously funny The lovely squiggly illustrations in color are exactly right The New Yorker

  • Title: Many Moons
  • Author: James Thurber Marc Simont
  • ISBN: 9780152018955
  • Page: 458
  • Format: Paperback
  • A wise tale of a little princess who wanted the moon and got it Grown ups themselves will find the book hilariously funny The lovely, squiggly illustrations in color are exactly right The New Yorker

    • Unlimited [Business Book] ↠ Many Moons - by James Thurber Marc Simont ↠
      458 James Thurber Marc Simont
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Business Book] ↠ Many Moons - by James Thurber Marc Simont ↠
      Posted by:James Thurber Marc Simont
      Published :2019-07-14T03:10:50+00:00

    About "James Thurber Marc Simont"

      • James Thurber Marc Simont

        Thurber was born in Columbus, Ohio to Charles L Thurber and Mary Agnes Mame Fisher Thurber Both of his parents greatly influenced his work His father, a sporadically employed clerk and minor politician who dreamed of being a lawyer or an actor, is said to have been the inspiration for the small, timid protagonist typical of many of his stories Thurber described his mother as a born comedienne and one of the finest comic talents I think I have ever known She was a practical joker, on one occasion pretending to be crippled and attending a faith healer revival, only to jump up and proclaim herself healed.Thurber had two brothers, William and Robert Once, while playing a game of William Tell, his brother William shot James in the eye with an arrow Because of the lack of medical technology, Thurber lost his eye This injury would later cause him to be almost entirely blind During his childhood he was unable to participate in sports and activities because of his injury, and instead developed a creative imagination, which he shared in his writings.From 1913 to 1918, Thurber attended The Ohio State University, where he was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity He never graduated from the University because his poor eyesight prevented him from taking a mandatory ROTC course In 1995 he was posthumously awarded a degree.From 1918 to 1920, at the close of World War I, Thurber worked as a code clerk for the Department of State, first in Washington, D.C and then at the American Embassy in Paris, France After this Thurber returned to Columbus, where he began his writing career as a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch from 1921 to 1924 During part of this time, he reviewed current books, films, and plays in a weekly column called Credos and Curios, a title that later would be given to a posthumous collection of his work Thurber also returned to Paris in this period, where he wrote for the Chicago Tribune and other newspapers.In 1925, he moved to Greenwich Village in New York City, getting a job as a reporter for the New York Evening Post He joined the staff of The New Yorker in 1927 as an editor with the help of his friend and fellow New Yorker contributor, E.B White His career as a cartoonist began in 1930 when White found some of Thurber s drawings in a trash can and submitted them for publication Thurber would contribute both his writings and his drawings to The New Yorker until the 1950s.Thurber was married twice In 1922, Thurber married Althea Adams The marriage was troubled and ended in divorce in May 1935 Adams gave Thurber his only child, his daughter Rosemary Thurber remarried in June, 1935 to Helen Wismer His second marriage lasted until he died in 1961, at the age of 66, due to complications from pneumonia, which followed upon a stroke suffered at his home His last words, aside from the repeated word God, were God bless God damn, according to Helen Thurber.


    705 Comments

    1. The first time I encountered Many Moons by James Thurber, it was read to me. I was in third grade. If the illustrations were shown, I didn't see them. And they weren't necessary for me to enjoy the book -- I could picture it perfectly in my head. The story stayed with me for many years. If I ever knew, I soon forgot the name of the author. I've since forgotten the name of my third-grade teacher. But I've never forgotten how much I loved this book.Years later, in my early twenties, I began readin [...]


    2. Many Moons by James Thurber, illustrated by Louis Slobodkin is a fairy tale about Princess Lenore, who asks for the moon when she is sick. The King summons all his wise men but none of them know how to get the moon. The Court Jester turns out to be the one to solve the problem.This charming, whimsical story has plenty of sly humor and a few challenging words (surfeit, physician etc.). Thurber writes about wisdom and the differing perceptions of children and adults. The concept of things being "i [...]


    3. Ivory, apes, and peacocks, rubies, opals, and emeralds, black orchids, pink elephants, and blue poodles, gold bugs, scarabs, and flies in amber, hummingbirds' tongues, angels' feathers, and unicorns' horns, giants, midgets, and mermaids, frankincense, ambergris, and myrrh, troubadours, minstrels, and dancing women.


    4. This book won the 1944 Caldecott, but this must've been another year where there wasn't much competition. I liked the book, though the story drones on for a bit. The book tells the story of a princess who falls ill and wants the moon, but all of her father's advisors say that the moon is impossible to get, until he asks the Court Jester, who takes a more logical-to-a-child approach to the situation. She gets her moon and gets well again. The next night, when the moon reappears, the king is frant [...]


    5. A little princess falls ill, and the only way she will get better is if she gets the moon. The king consults his wise men- the Lord High Chamberlain, the Royal Wizard, and the Royal Mathematician. In the end, it is the Court Jester who discovers the solution by consulting the princess. This story reminds all readers that answers are sometimes found in what seem the least likely places; and the wisdom of children should never be discounted.


    6. I love this story about a princess with a tummyache, who asks for the moon, and the jester who figures out how the king can get it for her. Way too wordy for a library storytime, this is a great lap book for parents to share with their own princesses. I prefer the illustrations by Marc Simont, even though the they aren't the ones that won the Caldecott.


    7. This is a book for children, but and their sneaky ways brought it to my attention because of my love for James Thurber. I remember this story from when I was a kid. I loved it then, too. I'm happy to add this copy to my Thurber collection. I will say that I do not have children, nor am I a librarian or someone who regularly reads children's literature so if you are looking for advice on if this is appropriate for your child, I don't know. This was written in 1943 and I think it's a charming sto [...]




    8. 1. Lenore is a princess who has fallen ill, and the only way to heal her is if she has the moon. The king loves his daughter very much as is prepared to do whatever to make her well again. He calls up his counsel one by one which consists of the Chamberlain, the Royal Wizard, and the Mathematician. The king asks each one to get him the moon, and each replies that the moon is too big and too far away to get for the princess. This upsets the so very much. Then the jester comes in and asks why he i [...]


    9. This was a book that my sister picked up for my niece from the library and it seemed like it was going to be a good book. Unfortunately upon opening the pages I noticed that there was more writing to a page than she is comfortable with thus making the story longer and the font is small, which led to my correct guess that she would get bored with the book before we got to far into it. Furthermore there wasn't much room to like the characters for they were rather flat and bland with only the court [...]


    10. 1. Book summary, in your own words (3 pts)Many Moons is a Caldecott Medal book. It is a book about a princess who asked her father to get the moon for her. The king then sets out to do just that calling all his counselors. They all seem to think it is impossible, though. Will the princess ever get the moon?2. Grade level, interest level, lexile (1 pt)This would be a great book for K-2nd grade. It is a cute short story, very easy to read. 3. Appropriate classroom use (subject area) (1 pt)I would [...]


    11. The story Many Moons, by James Thurber, is an adorable story of a sick, little princess who wants the moon to help her feel better and all the trouble her father the king goes through to get her the moon. This story was awarded the Caldecott award in 1944. The illustrations in this story are beautifully done and I would recommend this book especially to kids who love pictures and drawing. I really enjoyed the illustrations in this story. With such a cute story, you definitely need some cute illu [...]


    12. My mother must have read this to me so many times as a child-- I didn't think I recognized it from the title or cover, but as soon as I opened the book and saw the delicate, softly colored sketches, I couldn't help but breathe a nostalgic sigh. The illustrations in this book are a pure delight. I love the way the artist has the images winding around the text on some pages, unfurling from the scroll depicted on the opposite page. I love the expressive faces and body language of the characters, an [...]


    13. I enjoyed this one more than I thought I would. The little girl and the jester were both wise in their own ways. I appreciated the way that the jester accepted the girl and her ideas on her own terms. I also enjoyed the clever use of words in the story.


    14. this was a good story of a little princces wanted the moon and got it, this book allso has lots of wisdom in it.


    15. When King Daddy promises the moon, he delivers.A young princess gets sick because she eats too many raspberry tarts. She is so sick that she calls for her father the king, and he is so worried that he offers to get her anything she wants. She says she wants the moon. He thinks it's a reasonable request, since he has so many people working for him and believes they can figure it out, so he agrees. He then asks a bunch of people and they all tell him it's very far away and gigantic. Everybody he a [...]


    16. Many Moons, by James Thurber, is an example of traditional literature and is about a young princess who falls ill and the only cure for her sickness will be if she can have the moon. This book could be classified under the subgenre of a folktale because its purpose is to simply tell the story of a princess in a far off kingdom. The story begins with, "Once upon a time" and it continues with this fairy tale format.The setting for this story is similar to other fairy tales because it takes place i [...]


    17. Illustrated by Marc SimontThe Princess Lenore isn’t feeling well, and she asks for just one thing – the moon. She is certain this is the only thing that will make her well again. Her father, the King, summons his most trusted advisors, and tasks them with securing the moon for the Princess. But to a man, they declare this impossible. Until the Jester arrives and looks at the problem from a different angle.I love Thurber’s story-telling. I’ve previously read another of his fables for chil [...]


    18. Many Moons, by James Thurber is a children’s story about a young princess named Lenore who is sick from eating a raspberry tart. Lenore wants the moon to help her feel better again. Lenore’s father, the king, summons his wise man and tells him of his daughter’s request. The wise man is stumped, and does not know how he will get to the moon to ask it to help the king’s daughter. When the wise man doesn’t know how to ask the moon, the king summons the wizard and mathematician, but they a [...]


    19. James Thurber writes about the little Princess Lenore who has fallen ill. The king wants to do anything he can to make her feel well again and all the princess wants is the moon. He asks all his royal subjects to go and get the moon for his daughter but all of them laugh at him saying the moon is this big and this far away and made of this. Each royal subject thinks the moon is a different size, distance away and made of something different. Princess Lenore believes the moon is the size of her t [...]


    20. I fell in love with Many Moons because of the humor it had. When the king asks those who work for him to get the moon for his sick daughter, they reflect on all that they have done for him in the past along with a few additional elements that are added for the sake of humor like a short grocery list that was added by someone's wife or chores they need to do at home, etc. Surrounding the text when the workers are reflecting on what they have done for the king in the past, the illustrations displa [...]


    21. The king attempts to get the moon or his daughter, princess Lenore. Finally the jester gets the goldsmith to make a moon. Then the entire castle staff has to try to keep Lenore from seeing the real moon. When she does, she explains that it is like a lost tooth. When one is removed another grows in its place. This book would be great for cause and effect as well as problem and solution. The illustrations in this book are simple yet unique, they have s sketchy like look that makes the characters p [...]


    22. Fairly wordy. A princess gets sick and only wants the moon in order to get better. No one can figure out how to get it, until the jester asks the girl for help. She tells him how big the moon is and where it gets caught in the tree, so he goes up and catches the moon. They make a gold figure for around her neck and he gives her the "moon." The king is worried when the moon comes up again. But the jester asks the girl, how can the moon come up again when you are wearing it. She says, easy, like a [...]


    23. In this picture book with abstract illustrations of characters and the sky, a little princess requests the moon to help her heal while she is sick. This magical realism story tells about the King recruiting people to get the moon for his daughter so she can get well. However, it isn't until Court Jester sneaks into her room and explains that the moon is already in her possession, that her perspective of life quickly changes.


    24. I really enjoyed this book. I think one thing children will really enjoy are the long lists within the book. I am not sure why, but children love when there is super wordy long things to read, especially if you use silly voices. I loved that the jester was the one to figure everything out within this book. It shows children that you don't need to be the smartest or highest up to be able to make a difference and be smart in your own way.


    25. • 1944 Caldecott Winner •I like this story a lot - I think it works well - it’s long but interesting to read. I’m not enthused by Louis Slobodkin’s illustrations. They're very flowy and not distinctive, and I also felt like the pictures got worse towards the end. I really enjoyed the story though. Materials used: unlistedTypeface used: unlisted


    26. A King goes through numerous people and trials so that he can get the moon for his daughter and make her well again. Through funny and ridiculous recounts of all of the King's requests, we learn that he is a very needy man. It is finally the Court Jester that proves the most useful and clever, and is able to satisfy his daughter's wishes.


    27. Very cute fable/fairytale type story. I heard about this book from an Etsy listing for a moon necklace. It made me curious enough to read it and I enjoyed it. This princess tells her father that she will recover from her illness if someone gets the moon for her. He calls for all his best advisers, but it turns out the Court Jester is the best help he can get for his problem.


    28. The story was good. However this book won the Caldecott metal for it's pictures. I don't understand that. The pictures in my opinion could have been better.


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