Panic in Box C

Panic in Box C

John Dickson Carr / Dec 12, 2019

Panic in Box C Sailing from England to America with a writer friend Philip Knox Dr Gideon Fell that eminent crime solver encounters some odd characters who are fated to have a volcanic effect on his stay in the

  • Title: Panic in Box C
  • Author: John Dickson Carr
  • ISBN: 9780881842883
  • Page: 327
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Sailing from England to America with a writer friend, Philip Knox, Dr Gideon Fell, that eminent crime solver, encounters some odd characters, who are fated to have a volcanic effect on his stay in the U.S Prominent among them is the imperious Lady Tiverton the former actress, Margery Vane , her latest young lover, and her longtime female companion.All wind up at a dressSailing from England to America with a writer friend, Philip Knox, Dr Gideon Fell, that eminent crime solver, encounters some odd characters, who are fated to have a volcanic effect on his stay in the U.S Prominent among them is the imperious Lady Tiverton the former actress, Margery Vane , her latest young lover, and her longtime female companion.All wind up at a dress rehearsal in a Connecticut theater endowed by Miss Vane Murder stops the show, but provides Dr Fell with a superb opportunity to display his own singular talents.

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      Posted by:John Dickson Carr
      Published :2019-09-23T03:03:55+00:00

    About "John Dickson Carr"

      • John Dickson Carr

        AKA Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson and Roger Fairbairn.John Dickson Carr was born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1906 It Walks by Night, his first published detective novel, featuring the Frenchman Henri Bencolin, was published in 1930 Apart from Dr Fell, whose first appearance was in Hag s Nook in 1933, Carr s other series detectives published under the nom de plume of Carter Dickson were the barrister Sir Henry Merrivale, who debuted in The Plague Court Murders 1934.


    147 Comments

    1. When I started this novel, my phone, on which the book I was *actually* reading was located, had had an accident, and I was cut off from it. I dug out another John Dickson Carr while I waited. Phone never got fixed, but I now have a temporary one.In this book, we are introduced to a grand former actress who has put money into a failing regional theatre and its troupe of actors. At the last dress rehearsal of Romeo and Juliet before opening night, the theatre's benefactress gets shot with a cross [...]


    2. PANIC IN BOX C. (1966). John Dickson Carr. ****.They say that if a gun is shown in the first act of a play, it must be used before the end of act 3. That’s true in this mystery from Mr. Carr, featuring Dr. Gideon Fell, except that it’s not a gun that is brandished, but a crossbow. Crossbows galore in this adventure, because they are props for a new production of “Romeo and Juliet.” Dr. Fell is present throughout this story, but doesn’t seem to contribute much to sleuthing until near th [...]


    3. As my Dickson Carr to-read list gets smaller and smaller i tended to put this one further and further back.Its not held in particulary high esteem and Carr's work at this late stage was in decline.But on occasion he would still put out an good book and this is a case in point.It has an impossible crime of sorts,a woman shot with a crossbow bolt in a locked theatre box.Carr has done better problems than this one,but this is certainly plausible apart from an alibi which is perhaps a little unfair [...]


    4. BRAVO, JOHN DICKSON CARR! WHILE WATCHING A REHEARSAL OF A PLAY, A WOMAN IS MURDERED WHILE SEATED IN A BOX SEAT IN A LOCKED ROOM. WHO DID IT, HOW DID HE DO IT, AND WHY DID HE DO IT? READ THIS EXCELLENT MYSTERY, AND BE SURPRISED. MY FIRST EXPERIENCE WITH A JOHN DICKSON CARR MYSTERY NOVEL, AND I LOOK FORWARD TO READING MORE BY HIM.


    5. #22 in the Gideon Fell series, and I think the bloom has long been off the rose for me with these books. Something changed in Carr’s writing after World War II: and note how long a break he took between Fell books during that time period [eight or nine years, I think]. Although I really like the pre-war Fell books, with one or two exceptions, I really dislike the post-war volumes, which is sad. I may be mistaken, but it seems to me that Carr was trying too hard to be modern, to fit into the ch [...]


    6. Sometimes it doesn't pay to go back and reread. I'm not sure when I read John Dickson Carr's Panic in Box C the first time--but I liked it well enough to originally assign it four stars on Virtual Bookshelf. I'm not sure why. This is one of Carr's later mysteries and reading it this time aroundwell, it just didn't sit quite right.The story begins on board ship. Dr. Gideon Fell and his friend Philip Knox, a writer, are sailing from England to America. Each have been invited to the States for a le [...]


    7. Una ricca e capricciosa vedova viene uccisa, (come sempre nei romanzi di Carr) in maniera alquanto elaborata, durante le prove della compagnia teatrale che stava finanziando. La storia è ok fino al momento in cui non si svela il modo in cui l'assassino ha compiuto il proprio crimine. Lì, mi spiace dirlo, ogni genere di sospensione dell'incredulità (elemento necessario per gustarsi i delitti della camera chiusa, specie se si è assuefatti alla banalità della cronaca nera nel mondo reale) è a [...]


    8. I generally love John Dickson Carr, but this was not one of his best. Dialogue has not worn well with time, characters (other than Dr Fell) are unlikeable. This was one of his last books so perhaps his heart was no longer in his character. The one thing that held up, other than Gideon Fell, was the trademark "locked room", which is what kept me reading until the end.


    9. The explanation of murder is not satisfactory, in my opinion: Carr, when he explains how the arrow is stuck in the back of the victim, climbs a bit on the mirrors.However, the atmosphere of the novel is magnificent.



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